Tag Archives: Quantified Self Movement

Microbiome Apps Personalize EAT recommendations

Richard Sprague provides a useful update about the microbiome landscape below. Microbiome is exploding. Your gut can be measured, and your gut can influence your health and well-being. But now …. these gut measurements can offer people a first: personalized nutrition information.

Among the more relevant points:

– Israel’s Weitzman Institute is the global leader academically. Eran Elinav, a physician and immunologist at the Weizmann Institute and one of their lead investigators (see prior post).
– The older technology for measuring the gut is called “16S” sequencing. It tell you at a high level which kinds of microbes are present. It’s cheap and easy, but 16S can see only broad categories,
– The companies competing to measure your microbiome are uBiome, American Gut, Thryve, DayTwo and Viome. DayTwo and Viome offer more advanced technology (see below).
– The latest technology seems to be “metagenomic sequencing”. It is better because it is more specific and detailed.
– By combining “metagenomic sequencing” information with extensive research about how certain species interact with particular foods, machine-learning algorithms can recommend what you should eat.
– DayTwo offers a metagenomic sequencing for $299, and then combines that with all available research to offer personalized nutrition information.
– DayTwo recently completed a $12 million financing round from, among others, Mayo Clinic, which announced it would be validating the research in the U.S.
– DayTwo draws its academic understandings from Israel’s Weitzman Institute. The app is based on more than five years of highly cited research showing, for example, that while people on average respond similarly to white bread versus whole grain sourdough bread, the differences between individuals can be huge: what’s good for one specific person may be bad for another.

CREDIT: Article on Microbiome Advances

When a Double-Chocolate Brownie is Better for You Than Quinoa

A $299 microbiome test from DayTwo turns up some counterintuitive dietary advice.

Why do certain diets work well for some people but not others? Although several genetic tests try to answer that question and might help you craft ideal nutrition plans, your DNA reveals only part of the picture. A new generation of tests from DayTwo and Viome offer diet advice based on a more complete view: they look at your microbiome, the invisible world of bacteria that help you metabolize food, and, unlike your DNA, change constantly throughout your life.
These bugs are involved in the synthesis of vitamins and other compounds in food, and they even play a role in the digestion of gluten. Artificial sweeteners may not contain calories, but they do modify the bacteria in your gut, which may explain why some people continue to gain weight on diet soda. Everyone’s microbiome is different.

So how well do these new tests work?
Basic microbiome tests, long available from uBiome, American Gut, Thryve, and others, based on older “16S” sequencing, can tell you at a high level which kinds of microbes are present. It’s cheap and easy, but 16S can see only broad categories, the bacterial equivalent of, say, canines versus felines. But just as your life might depend on knowing the difference between a wolf and a Chihuahua, your body’s reaction to food often depends on distinctions that can be known only at the species level. The difference between a “good” microbe and a pathogen can be a single DNA base pair.

New tests use more precise “metagenomic” sequencing that can make those distinctions. And by combining that information with extensive research about how those species interact with particular foods, machine-learning algorithms can recommend what you should eat. (Disclosure: I am a former “citizen scientist in residence” at uBiome. But I have no current relationship with any of these companies; I’m just an enthusiast about the microbiome.)

I recently tested myself with DayTwo ($299) to see what it would recommend for me, and I was pleased that the advice was not always the standard “eat more vegetables” that you’ll get from other products claiming to help you eat healthily. DayTwo’s advice is much more specific and often refreshingly counterintuitive. It’s based on more than five years of highly cited research at Israel’s Weizmann Institute, showing, for example, that while people on average respond similarly to white bread versus whole grain sourdough bread, the differences between individuals can be huge: what’s good for one specific person may be bad for another.

In my case, whole grain breads all rate C-. French toast with challah bread: A.

The DayTwo test was pretty straightforward: you collect what comes out of your, ahem, gut, which involves mailing a sample from your time on the toilet. Unlike the other tests, which can analyze the DNA found in just a tiny swab from a stain on a piece of toilet paper, DayTwo requires more like a tablespoon. The extra amount is needed for DayTwo’s more comprehensive metagenomics sequencing.

Since you can get a microbiome test from other companies for under $100, does the additional metagenomic information from DayTwo justify its much higher price? Generally, I found the answer is yes.

About two months after I sent my sample, my iPhone lit up with my results in a handy app that gave me a personalized rating for most common foods, graded from A+ to C-. In my case, whole grain breads all rate C-. Slightly better are pasta and oatmeal, each ranked C+. Even “healthy” quinoa — a favorite of gluten-free diets — was a mere B-. Why? DayTwo’s algorithm can’t say precisely, but among the hundreds of thousands of gut microbe and meal combinations it was trained on, it finds that my microbiome doesn’t work well with these grains. They make my blood sugar rise too high.

So what kinds of bread are good for me? How about a butter croissant (B+) or cheese ravioli (A-)? The ultimate bread winner for me: French toast with challah bread (A). These recommendations are very different from the one-size-fits-all advice from the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the American Diabetes Association.

I was also pleased to learn that a Starbucks double chocolate brownie is an A- for me, while a 100-calorie pack of Snyder’s of Hanover pretzels gets a C-. That might go against general diet advice, but an algorithm determined that the thousands of bacterial species inside me tend to metabolize fatty foods in a way that results in healthier blood sugar levels than what I get from high-carb foods. Of course, that’s advice just for me; your mileage may vary.

Although the research behind DayTwo has been well-reviewed for more than five years, the app is new to the U.S., so the built-in food suggestions often seem skewed toward Middle Eastern eaters, perhaps the Israeli subjects who formed the original research cohort. That might explain why the app’s suggestions for me include lamb souvlaki with yogurt garlic dip for dinner (A+) and lamb kabob and a side of lentils (A) for lunch. They sound delicious, but to many American ears they might not have the ring of “pork ribs” or “ribeye steak,” which have the same A+ rating. Incidentally, DayTwo recently completed a $12 million financing round from, among others, Mayo Clinic, which announced it would be validating the research in the U.S., so I expect the menu to expand with more familiar fare.

Fortunately you’re not limited to the built-in menu choices. The app includes a “build a meal” function that lets you enter combinations of foods from a large database that includes packaged items from Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods.

There is much more to the product, such as a graphical rendering of where my microbiome fits on the spectrum of the rest of the population that eats a particular food. Since the microbiome changes constantly, this will help me see what is different when I do a retest and when I try Viome and other tests.

I’ve had my DayTwo results for only a few weeks, so it’s too soon to know what happens if I take the app’s advice over the long term. Thankfully I’m in good health and reasonably fit, but for now I’ll be eating more strawberries (A+) and blackberries (A-), and fewer apples (B-) and bananas (C+). And overall I’m looking forward to a future where each of us will insist on personalized nutritional information. We all have unique microbiomes, and an app like DayTwo lets us finally eat that way too.

Richard Sprague is a technology executive and quantified-self enthusiast who has worked at Apple, Microsoft, and other tech companies. He is now the U.S. CEO of an AI healthcare startup, Airdoc.

====================APPENDIX: Older Posts about the microbiome =========

Microbiome Update
CREDIT: https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-disrupting-your-guts-rhythm-affects-your-health-1488164400?mod=e2tw A healthy community of microbes in the gut maintains regular daily cycles of activities. A healthy community of microbes in the gut maintains regular daily cycles of activities.PHOTO: WEIZMANN INSTITUTE By LARRY M. GREENBERG Updated Feb. 27, 2017 3:33 p.m. ET 4 COMMENTS New research is helping to unravel the mystery of how […]

Vibrant Health measures microbiome

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Microbiome Update
My last research on this subject was in August, 2014. I looked at both microbiomes and proteomics. Today, the New York Times published a very comprehensive update on microbiome research: Link to New York Time Microbiome Article Here is the article itself: = = = = = = = ARTICLE BEGINS HERE = = = […]

Microbiomes
Science is advancing on microbiomes in the gut. The key to food is fiber, and the key to best fiber is long fibers, like cellulose, uncooked or slightly sauteed (cooking shortens fiber length). The best vegetable, in the view of Jeff Leach, is a leek. Eating Well Article on Microbiome = = = = = […]

Arivale Launches LABS company
“Arivale” Launched and Moving Fast. They launched last month. They have 19 people in the Company and a 107 person pilot – but their plans are way more ambitious than that. Moreover: “The founders said they couldn’t envision Arivale launching even two or three years ago.” Read on …. This is an important development: the […]

Precision Wellness at Mt Sinai
My Sinai announcement Mount Sinai to Establish Precision Wellness Center to Advance Personalized Healthcare Mount Sinai Health System Launches Telehealth Initiatives Joshua Harris, co-Founder of Apollo Global Management, and his wife, Marjorie has made a $5 million gift to the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to establish the Harris Center for Precision Wellness. […]

Proteomics
“Systems biology…is about putting together rather than taking apart, integration rather than reduction. It requires that we develop ways of thinking about integration that are as rigorous as our reductionist programmes, but different….It means changing our philosophy, in the full sense of the term” (Denis Noble).[5] Proteomics From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For the journal […]

8 Health Habits

CREDIT: NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLE POSTED BELOW
===============SUMMARY=============

Weigh yourself often.
Learn to cook
Cut back on sugar.
Live an active life. 

Eat your veggies.
Practice portion control.

Adopt a post-party exercise routine. 
 

Find a job you love.

============ JCR NOTES ==========

As we enter 2017, I am in the mood for simplifying well-being, which is why I like this list above. But I want to cross-check it against what I know.

For example, I long have asserted that “MARVELS” are critical to well-being. MARVELS stands for MEDS (M), ACTIVITY (A), RESILIENCE (R), VITALS (V), EATING (E), LABS (L), AND SLEEP (S).

I still believe this. But it is complicated – can it be simpler?

The article suggests – correctly – that in your 20’s, “what’s important now” is developing and maintaining an active, healthy lifestyle. It emphasizes E (a healthy diet, moderate alcohol consumption and no smoking), and A (regular physical activity).

Just for fun, what if the most simplistic acronym was “EAT”, which stands for:

E – eating, drinking, smoking ………….(what you put into your body)
“be mindful about what you put in your body, by tracking it, and enjoy taking increasing control over this by developing related habits such as learning to cook or juicing”
A – activity, including rest and sleep ….(what you do with your body)
“Be mindful about what you do with your body by staying active and getting plenty of rest”
T – track E and A ….
“Develop quantified self habits that track E and A and regularly verify that your body is operating normally”

So I might restate “what is important now” for people in their 20’s:

You want to fully enjoy your life in your 20’s – without putting your 30’s,, 40’s and beyond at risk – develop AHL (active, healthy living) habits that you enjoy, so that they have a good chance of being with you the rest of your life. stay lean and well-rested during your 20’s. To get that way, eat and drink well, don’t smoke,

Tracking:

Daily (get a routine, like taking a shower): M, A, E, and M. (Track what you put in your body (E) and what you do with your body (A and S) daily.

Simple checklist is this. Today, did you:
“Take MEDS as prescribed” (were you in compliance?)?
“Smoke?”
“Eat your veggies?”
“use sugar, especially alcohol, in moderation?”
“stay active with activities that can be life habits?”

Monthly: V (Track your vital signs, including body weight and body mass monthly.)

Annually: L (Track your lab results annually, and more frequently if results are out of normal range). L includes genomes – so do them once, and annually if V or L is out of normal range.

==============KEY STUDY===========

Staying healthy in your 20s is strongly associated with a lower risk for heart disease in middle age, according to research from Northwestern University. That study showed that most people who adopted five healthy habits in their 20s – a lean body mass index, moderate alcohol consumption, no smoking, a healthy diet and regular physical activity – stayed healthy well into middle age.

===============ARTICLE=============
The 8 Health Habits Experts Say You Need in Your 20s
By TARA PARKER-POPE OCT. 17, 2016
If you had just one piece of health advice for people in their 20s, what would it be?
That’s the question we posed to a number of experts in nutrition, obesity, cardiology and other health disciplines. While most 20-year-olds don’t worry much about their health, studies show the lifestyle and health decisions we make during our third decade of life have a dramatic effect on how well we age.
Staying healthy in your 20s is strongly associated with a lower risk for heart disease in middle age, according to research from Northwestern University. That study showed that most people who adopted five healthy habits in their 20s – a lean body mass index, moderate alcohol consumption, no smoking, a healthy diet and regular physical activity – stayed healthy well into middle age.
And a disproportionate amount of the weight we gain in life is accumulated in our 20s, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The average woman in the United States weighs about 150 when she’s 19, but by the time she’s 29, she weighs 162 pounds – that’s a gain of 12 pounds. An average 19-year-old man weighs 175 pounds, but by the time he hits 29 he is nine pounds heavier, weighing in at 184 pounds.
But it can be especially difficult for a young adult to focus on health. Young people often spend long hours at work, which can make it tough to exercise and eat well. They face job pressure, romantic challenges, money problems and family stress. Who has time to think about long-term health?
To make it easier, we asked our panel of experts for just one simple piece of health advice. We skipped the obvious choices like no smoking or illegal drug use – you know that already. Instead we asked them for simple strategies to help a 20-something get on the path to better health. Here’s what they had to say.

Weigh yourself often. 
- Susan Roberts, professor of nutrition at Tufts University and co-founder of the iDiet weight management program 
Buy a bathroom scale or use one at the gym and weigh yourself regularly. There is nothing more harmful to long-term health than carrying excess pounds, and weight tends to creep up starting in the 20s. It is pretty easy for most people to get rid of three to five pounds and much harder to get rid of 20. If you keep an eye on your weight you can catch it quickly.

Learn to cook. 
- Barbara J. Rolls, professor and Guthrie Chair of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State 
Learning to cook will save you money and help you to eat healthy. Your focus should be on tasty ways to add variety to your diet and to boost intake of veggies and fruits and other nutrient-rich ingredients. As you experiment with herbs and spices and new cooking techniques, you will find that you can cut down on the unhealthy fats, sugar and salt, as well as the excess calories found in many prepared convenience foods. Your goal should be to develop a nutritious and enjoyable eating pattern that is sustainable and that will help you not only to be well, but also to manage your weight. 
(Related: The foods you should stop buying and start making yourself) 


Cut back on sugar. 
- Steven E. Nissen, chairman of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation 
I suggest that young people try to avoid excessive simple sugar by eliminating the most common sources of consumption: 1) sugared soft drinks 2) breakfast cereals with added sugar and 3) adding table sugar to foods. Excessive sugar intake has been linked to obesity and diabetes, both of which contribute to heart disease. Sugar represents “empty calories” with none of the important nutrients needed in a balanced diet. Conversely, the traditional dietary villains, fat, particularly saturated fat, and salt, have undergone re-examination by many thoughtful nutrition experts. In both cases, the available scientific evidence does not clearly show a link to heart disease. 

Live an active life. 
- Walter Willett, chairman of the nutrition department at the Harvard School for Public Health 
While many people can’t find time for a scheduled exercise routine, that doesn’t mean you can’t find time to be active. Build physical activity into your daily life. Find a way to get 20 or 30 minutes of activity each day, including riding a bike or briskly walking to work. 
(Related: Learn how to run like a pro.) 


Eat your veggies. 
- Marion Nestle, professor of nutrition, food studies and public health at New York University 
Nutrition science is complicated and debated endlessly, but the basics are well established: Eat plenty of plant foods, go easy on junk foods, and stay active. The trick is to enjoy your meals, but not to eat too much or too often. 

Practice portion control. 
- Lisa R. Young, adjunct professor of nutrition at New York University 
My tip would be to not to ban entire food groups but to practice portion control. Portion control doesn’t mean tiny portions of all foods – quite the opposite. It’s okay to eat larger portions of healthy foods like vegetables and fruit. No one got fat from eating carrots or bananas. Choose smaller portions of unhealthy foods such as sweets, alcohol and processed foods. When eating out, let your hand be your guide. A serving of protein like chicken or fish should be the size of your palm. (Think 1-2 palms of protein.) A serving of starch, preferably a whole grain such as brown rice or quinoa should be the size of your fist. Limit high-fat condiments like salad dressing to a few tablespoons – a tablespoon is about the size of your thumb tip. 

Adopt a post-party exercise routine. 
- Barry Popkin, professor of global nutrition at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 
If you engage in a lot of drinking and snacking, ensure you exercise a lot to offset all those extra calories from Friday to Sunday that come with extra drinking and eating. We found in a study that on Friday through Sunday young adults consumed about 115 more calories than on other days, mainly from fat and alcohol. 


Find a job you love. 
- Hui Zheng, associate sociology professor, population health, Ohio State University 
Ohio State University research found that work life in your 20s can affect your midlife mental health. People who are less happy in their jobs are more likely to report depression, stress and sleep problems and have lower overall mental health scores. If I can give just one piece of health advice for 20-year-olds, I would suggest finding a job they feel passionate about. This passion can keep them motivated, help them find meaning in life, and increase expectations about their future. That in turn will make them more engaged in life and healthier behaviors, which will have long term benefits for their well-being.

Helix.com takes genomics commercial

I believe that genomics just advanced …. headed to commercialization. Read on.

I received this as a gift, and just registered my saliva sample. “Geno 2.0”. As with ancestry.com, the “hook” is they promise a profile of your ancestry. Clever – does not over-promise.

Cost …. $149?

Took 10 minutes. Very cool box, like something from Apple. Inside was an equally cool, self-addressed, stamped box. Fancy test tube inside. Coded carefully – right on the sample tube. Protected for shipment … Nice. Netflix started with a kit like this.

They have 800,000 samples so far. Partnered with National Geographic, Duke, bunch of others. I registered separately – online. Great privacy policy.

This is only the beginning….like the Internet when AOL was the only game in town, and Amazon only sold books.

Go to Helix

Helix seems to be a venture-backed company – Kleiner, Warburg Pincus, and Mayo are shown as investors.

The essence of their value proposition seems to be “products that will be offered by our partners in the future.” These products will obviously draw upon the database that is being accumulated.

Solid Scientific Advisory Board.

Duke shown as partner. National Geographic as well.

Genography.com seems to be another of their sites? Partner.

Diabetes Wearables

WIRED Magazine Diabetes Article May 2015

WIRED Magazine offers a lay person’s update on the qualified self movement as it relates to diabetics and glucose monitoring:

LARISSA ZIMBEROFF
DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.27.15

GLUCOSE-SENSING CONTACTS AND MORE BRILLIANT DIABETES TECH

MORE THAN 200 million people on this planet worry about the same invisible villain: their blood glucose. High, low, just right? For many of these diabetics, it’s a medical version of Goldilocks that entails four or more blood-test finger pricks a day and a jab in the thigh with a needle full of insulin at mealtimes. It’s a drag and I should know—I was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic 20 years ago. At the time my father thought to himself, “She’ll be cured by the time she’s in college.” I’m now well beyond college age, and not only do I still have diabetes but I still use (basically) the same hardware and medications.

The options for managing my disease are limited: multiple devices embedded under my skin and stuffed into my pockets—insulin pump, continuous glucose monitor, and my phone; or a black nylon pouch (made in Taiwan) filled with needles, insulin vials, and a flimsy plastic glucose monitor. It’s like carrying a tiny hospital in your purse—not something you want to spill onto a table on a first date.

If my car can drive itself and my phone can open my front door, turn on the heater, and take my dog for a walk, isn’t it time we had a major breakthrough in the gear that helps us manage this disease? Well, we’re about to.

==========
Inhaled Insulin (Afrezza)
Huffing insulin is way better than shooting insulin: Use a device that looks like a pipe to inhale a microfine human-insulin powder. It peaks in the bloodstream 15 minutes later and exits just as rapidly, which is more how natural levels of this blood-sugar-regulating hormone work.
How long it will take to reach patients: As long as it takes you to make an appointment with your doc. (I started using it in April.)

==========
OneDrop Glucose Meter (OneDrop)
Razorfish cofounder Jeff Dachis has redesigned the glucose meter, “one of the most unloved products on the planet.” With this compact gadget you’ll feel like Jony Ive when you check your blood sugar.
How long it will take to reach patients: The app is available from iTunes now, so you can log and share readouts from the traditional ugly meters you already have. The slinky new model should ship in early 2016.

==========
FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System (Abbott)
Much like a continuous glucose monitor, but tiny and with no cords, this glucose monitor is the size of a quarter and sticks to the arm with a tiny semi-invasive sensor just underneath your skin. Wave a small digital reader over it to know if you’re trending high or low. Sensors last for 14 days. One thing that’s important to note: When researchers focus on alternate body fluids like eye fluid or the stuff just under the skin, they have to create algorithms to convert, say, the eye fluid data into traditional blood data.
How long it will take to reach patients: Coming soon! It’s already in Europe and US trials are complete.

==========
Temporary Tattoo (Center for Wearable Sensors at UC San Diego)
A mild electrical current forces subdermal glucose to the skin’s surface. Sensors in this temporary tattoo measure the resulting electrical charge, and algorithms will translate that into a blood sugar reading.
How long it will take to reach patients: It’s noninvasive, so this project has less to worry about from the FDA than others might. Say 2017?
==========
Smart Contacts (Google and Alcon)
These smart contacts are a collaboration between Google and Alcon. (The technology was developed by GoogleX.) A glucose sensor rings the periphery of a contact lens, reading the tear fluid and sending a signal to a tiny circuit that translates the reading into a glucose level. Then it’s onward, wirelessly, to a smartphone. In addition to the electric components, the lenses can hold a prescription. (Bonus!) Finally, eyewear from Google that people actually want.
How long it will take to reach patients: Up to a decade.

MARVELS for Wellbeing

MARVELS is a way of dimensionalizing wellbeing. The acronym stands for:

M – MEDICAL ID (conditions, medications, allergies, emergency contacts, etc)
A – ACTIVITY (what I do with my body, including walking, running, calories burned etc)
R – RESILIENCE (key to managing stress and its harmful effects)
V – VITALS (pulse, BP, weight, height, body mass, etc)
E – EATING (what I put in my body, including what I eat, drink and smoke, calories consumeed etc)
L – LABS (blood, urine, sputum, hair, stool, screening, as well as genome mapping)
S – SLEEP (duration, deep sleep, etc)

The argument for MARVELS can be simplified by simply saying: every person’s wellbeing will be a function of who they are, and what they do in any given time period. Who they are requires quantification, including M (MEDICAL ID), R (RESILIENCE), V (VITALS), AND L (LABS). What they do in any given time period is a function of A and E – what they do with their body and what they put in their body.

Cardiologists and Wearables

Mark Bard writes:

Your Cardiologist Does Not Want Your Wearable Data – Addressing the Concerns of Physicians As We Enter the “Connected Health” Era

Last week we discussed the current and future market opportunity for patients with heart disease to utilize health and fitness trackers. Only 12% of cardiovascular/heart disease patients are using trackers – and only 6% more report they are interested in using them in the future. However, understanding the patient side of the question is only one side of the equation. For connected health (and wearables) to drive the most value we really need the cardiologists/physician to be part of the equation through utilization of the data in care and treatment planning or by providing positive reinforcement to patients using the technology.

Recent data from Digital Insights Group show approximately 1 in 4 cardiologists currently have patients sharing data from fitness and activity trackers (such as Fitbit) with them in their practice. This number is higher than the number of patients using a device because it reflects the population of physicians with any patients using a device to share data with them in their practice.

Beyond the current population of cardiologists utilizing patient generated activity and fitness data, future interest (based on current devices and data streams) remains limited at the current time. In an effort to better understand what is holding back all those physicians we explored some of the barriers to making the move – or using data from patients attempting to share the data with their physician today.

The number one objection among cardiologists today is … Fear of Data Overload. Just over half of cardiologists agree the potential stream of user-generated health and activity data may be too much to assimilate, integrate, and utilize with regard to making treatment decisions. This underlines the importance of tools and dashboards to help physicians (and their team) better understand the trends, outliers, and how to quickly and efficiently integrate the data into their existing medical records platforms.

The next one (and perhaps understated given we don’t have a lot of examples in this space yet) is the liability of receiving this data from patients. In other words, imagine the deposition lawyer asking a cardiologist about when his practice received data showing the patient was clearly engaged in physical activity that placed them at risk given their recent diagnosis and proposed treatment plan. Yes, we’ll eventually be able to limit the scope and place the responsibility back with the patient … but until that time cardiologists (and physicians overall) will be cautious to blindly accept user-generated data.

Finally, one that will take time to address is the concern that the data generated from various devices lacks any sense of “data standards” that can be used to plan care for specific patients. In other words, will one or two platforms became the “gold standard” for key cardiovascular and heart related metrics generated by these platforms? Have those metrics been verified in clinical trials (or any trials) to show a correlation to health, wellness, treatment, and outcomes?

The transition to connected health has already begun and the latest push from Apple and Google should help move the industry forward. However, engaging the physician and addressing their key concerns (data overload, liability, standards) will be critical to making the transition effective for both the patient and their physician.

Well-Being – Real Time

The future is now. MARVELS is here.

The quantified self movement brings with it the very real opportunity to bring personal well-being into a real-time modality.

MARVELS is the acronym for what is possible:

Monitoring of:
M – MEDS (what MEDS I take, what compliance I have, etc)
A – ACTIVITY (walking, running, calories burned etc)
R – Resting Metabolic Rate (calories burned at rest)
V – VITALS (pulse, BP, etc)
E – EATS (what I eat and drink, especially calories)
L – LABS (blood testing, etc)
S – Sleep (duration, deep sleep, etc)

In any given setting – a community, a workplace, an assisted living facility, a spa, or even a well-being oriented pharmacy like CVS or Walgreens – monitoring of MARVELS (MEDS, Activity, Resting Metabolism,VITALS, EATS, LABS, Sleep) is now going to accelerate at an exponential rate.

The Privacy Imperative will be the critical success factor for all of these pushes into the future. It is foundational.

Without it, there will be no progress.

With it, personalized, real-time care will flourish. Each individual will be able to opt-in to his care-coaching community (and to opt-out whenever they choose), and get the extraordinary benefits that such a community can provide.

Want to talk to your well-being coach? FaceTime them, and they – with your permission – will help you sort out what’s going on with you.

Feel like you might need a check-in with a doctor? Send them an email – with your MARVELS history embedded in it, or get them on the phone or FaceTime, and see if they need you to come in.

The future is now.

BEWELL Centers will be EVERYWHERE. Look for:

DWELL CENTERS (part of BEWELL Centers) – for community MARVELS measuring and monitoring support. Target population is neighbors in the community.

EWELL CENTERS (part of BEWELL Centers) – for employees in workplaces MARVELS measuring and monitoring support. Target population is employees in the workplace.

SWELL CENTERS (Part of BEWELL Centers – for service-providers MARVELS measuring and monitoring support.Target population is customers of the service provider.
(Walgreens and CVS are already moving aggressively in this direction>

References:
The Privacy Imperative
LABS revolution
LABS By Disease
Quantified Self Movement

History of Computing


Www.computerhistory.org/timeline/

See also 2001 and 2007 posts (this is a more extensive more current update):

And