Tag Archives: biography

Brother Jim

Here’s a short biography of my older brother James Robert Reid, born December 10, 1948:

Fall of 1967*, commuter freshman at Northeastern (with Bobby Tallent, Tommy Carabine, Peter Flynn) , Business Administration major. Bad student.
Joined rowing team. At 6’2″ I was the smallest guy in the boat.

Fall of 1968, made the Varsity, our eight won The Head of the Charles Regatta.*
Worked an interesting variety of NU Co-Op jobs, Boston Globe*, Haskins and Sells*.
1969, changed major to English, better student.

1970, my fiancee, Jeanne Nelson’ s father, a towboat captain for Perini Corp. finagled me a deckhand job (perhaps my best job ever) on Dredge #111 which was dredging the inlet/cooling water channel for the Plymouth Nuclear Power Plant.*
1970, married Jeanne Nelson (too young, imo). First apt at 287 Beacon Street. I could bike to NU, both school and the crew boathouse (stored my treasured Mercier 10 speed in the bathtub). Jeanne could walk to work for the Sonnabends at the Sonesta.
Fall, 1970, Still in the Varsity boat, Olympians Dietz and Coffey powered us to another win in the Head of the Charles Regatta.

June 1972, graduated from NU at Boston Garden, enduring the hot, hanging stink of the previous week’s circus animals.

August, 1972, reported to US Naval Reserve, AOCS and flight training, in Pensacola Florida, 95° and 95% humidity. Met my first surly Marine D.I., Sgt. E. Beadle.*
Dec 1972, graduated from AOCS, commissioned as an Ensign, USNR. Reported for Primary flight training at NAS Saufley, flying T-34, single engine, low wing trainer. Instructor Lt. Ron Pritz, USMC (helicopter pilot).

May 29, 1973, daughter Amy born on base hospital, costing $5.25 (Jeanne’s meals).
Left flying and applied for honorable discharge. While waiting for BUPERS paperwork, I was stationed as a P.A. (Public Affairs) Officer with The Blue Angels, traveled the country to airshows, ironically promoting Navy flying, even though I had left it.*
Summer, 1973, Navy moved us back to Winthrop during the Arab oil embargo, recession, no jobs, scary with young family. From that point, personal and economic frustration ate at our marriage, probably doomed it, we divorced in 1975. Lived out of boxes with my parents for awhile. Moved to Boston, walking distance from where I was working (at NU). Started MBA studies, A student.

I’ll tell you the “rest of the story” when I see you. All good now, just celebrated 36 years of second marriage, writing (two children’s books for sale on Amazon). Along the way, I worked in Admin for 3 tech companies, learned hardscaping and landscaping, frame and finish carpentry, cabinet making, land surveying, stone masonry, woodstove installation, served 6 years on regional school committee, had a stint in direct sales, drove executive cars for BostonCoach, now still work on my 1953 Ford Jubilee farm tractor, still felling trees, burning wood, just held 24th Extreme Camping with old, and good friends (long story).

* I have written extensively about these experiences. Stay tuned for self-publication of my collection of “memoir essays”, working title, Missing Man.

Harvard Economic Research Project

After my senior year at Brandeis, my Economics Department Chair, Dr. Anne Carter, asked me to intern for the summer of 1972 at the Harvard Economic Research Project. It was an amazing time.

Dr. Carter was the Director of Research for the Project, which was begun in 1948 by Wassily Leontief. Leontief remained its director until 1973.

Little did I know that Wassily Leontief would receive the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1973. And Anne Carter, who certainly mentored me, went on to become Dean of Faculty at Brandeis.

The Project was to exploit the new methodology of Input-Output Economics, using the very primitive computers available at the time.

My summer job was to see if I could find tools that would allow the methodology to be used in environmental fields. I decided to focus on water pollution, and zeroed on on the extent to which water pollution could be predicted by the extent to which “biochemical oxygen demand” was present in any given body of water.