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Tesla and Energy Storage

CREDIT: Guardian Story on Tesla and Energy Storage

Tesla moves beyond electric cars with new California battery farm

From the road, the close to 400 white industrial boxes packed into 1.5 acres of barren land in Ontario, California, a little more than 40 miles from downtown Los Angeles, look like standard electrical equipment. They’re surrounded by a metal fence, stand on concrete pads and sit under long electrical lines.

But take a closer look and you’ll notice the bright red coloring and gray logo of electric car company Tesla on the sides. And inside the boxes are thousands of battery cells – the same ones that are used in Tesla’s electric cars – made by the company in its massive $5bn Tesla Gigafactory outside of Reno, Nevada.

This spot, located at the Mira Loma substation of Southern California Edison, hosts the biggest battery farm Tesla has built for a power company. Southern California Edison will use the battery farm, which has been operating since December and is one of the biggest in the world, to store energy and meet spikes in demand – like on hot summer afternoons when buildings start to crank up the air conditioning.

Tesla’s project has a capacity of 20 megawatts and is designed to discharge 80-megawatt hours of electricity in four-hour periods. It contains enough batteries to run about 1,000 Tesla cars, and the equivalent energy to supply power to 15,000 homes for four hours. The company declined to disclose the project’s cost.

The project marks an important point in Tesla’s strategy to expand beyond the electric car business. Developing battery packs is a core expertise for the company, which is designing packs for homes, businesses and utilities. It markets them partly as a way to store solar electricity for use after sundown, a pitch that works well for states with a booming solar energy market such as California.

Battery systems built for power companies can serve more than one purpose. A utility can avoid blackouts by charging them up when its natural gas power plants, or solar and wind farms, produce more electricity than needed, and draw from them when the power plants aren’t able to keep up with demand.

Edison and other California utilities hired Tesla and a few other battery farm builders after an important natural gas reservoir near Los Angeles, called Aliso Canyon, closed following a huge leak and massive environmental disaster in late 2015. The leak forced thousands of people in nearby neighborhoods to evacuate. It also left utilities worried about how they’d meet the peak electricity demands of coming summers if they weren’t able to dip into the natural gas storage whenever they need fuel to produce power. They couldn’t always get natural gas shipment from other suppliers quick enough to meet a sharp rise in electricity consumption.

As a result, the California Public Utilities Commission approved 100 megawatts of energy storage projects for both Southern California Edison and also San Diego Gas & Electric. The commission also asked for the projects to be built quickly, before the end of 2016.

Other energy storage projects that have been built since include a 37.5-megawatt project in San Diego County by AES Energy Storage, which used lithium-ion batteries from Samsung. AES has completed the project, which is going through the commissioning phase. AES also plans to build a 100-megawatt project for Southern California Edison in Long Beach in 2020.
Even before the Aliso Canyon disaster, the commission had already recognized the benefit of using energy storage to manage supply and demand and expected it to become an important component in the state’s plan to replace fossil fuel energy with renewables. The commission, which requires the state’s three big utilities to add more wind and solar energy to their supplies over time, also set a statement energy storage target of 1,325 megawatts by 2020.
Surrounded by rows of batteries at a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the project on Monday, Southern California Edison’s CEO Kevin Payne said the Tesla project is important because “it validates that energy storage can be part of the energy mix now” and is “a great reminder of how fast technology is changing the electric power industry”.

This latest crop of energy storage projects use a new generation of lithium-ion batteries. Historically, batteries were too expensive for energy storage, but their prices have dropped dramatically in recent years, thanks to their mass production by companies such as Panasonic, Tesla and Samsung.
Companies that buy lithium-ion batteries have been reporting drops in prices of 70% over the past two years. Tesla has said it plans to lower its battery prices by 30% by expanding production inside its Gigafactory.
At the event on Monday, Tesla’s co-founder and chief technology officer JB Straubel said: “Storage has been missing on the grid since it was invented.”

Tesla is counting on the energy storage market as an important source of revenue and built its giant factory with that in mind.
The company believes its expertise in engineering and building electric cars sets itself apart from other battery farm developers. Tesla has been developing battery packs for a decade and improved the technology that manages the batteries temperatures, which can be high enough to pose a fire risk.
Overheating is a well known problem for lithium-ion batteries, which require insulating materials and software to keep them running cool. A battery farm built next to a wind farm in Hawaii by a now-bankrupt company caught fire in 2012 and temporarily put a dampener on the energy storage market.
Tesla has been building another battery farm on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, and has projects in Connecticut, North Carolina, New Zealand and the UK.
The company is looking for opportunities to build battery farms outside of California, including the East Coast and countries such as Germany, Australia and Japan. Tesla co-founder and CEO Elon Musk has said in the past that the company’s energy storage business could one day be bigger than its car business.

Fixed Costs of the Grid … 55%?

CREDIT: http://www.edisonfoundation.net/iee/Documents/IEE_ValueofGridtoDGCustomers_Sept2013.pdf

“Distributed generation” (DG) is what the electric utility industry calls solar panels, wind turbines, etc.

The article points out what is well-known: even with aggressive use of solar, any DG customer still needs the grid ….. at least this is true until a reasonable cost methodology for storing electricity at the point of generation comes on-line (at which time perhaps a true “off-grid” location is possible.

So …. for a DG customer …. the grid becomes a back-up, a source of power when the sun does not shine, the wind does not blow, etc.

So the fairness question is: should a DG customer pay for their fair share of the grid? Asked this way, the answer is obvious: yes. Just like people pay for insurance, in that same way should people be asked to pay for the cost of the grid.

Unfortunately, these costs are astronomical. This paper claims that they are 55% of total costs!

“In this example, the typical residential customer consumes, on average, about 1000 kWh per month and pays an average monthly bill of about $110 (based on EIA data). About half of that bill (i.e., $60 per month) covers charges related to the non-energy services provided by the grid….”

GRID

Bill Gates recommended GRID as one of his five favorite books in 2016. Here is what Business Insider said:

“‘The Grid: The Fraying Wires Between Americans and Our Energy Future’ by Gretchen Bakke

“The Grid” is a perfect example of how Bill Gates thinks about book genres the way Netflix thinks about TV and movies.

“This book, about our aging electrical grid, fits in one of my favorite genres: ‘Books About Mundane Stuff That Are Actually Fascinating,'” he writes.

Growing up in the Seattle area, Gates’ first job was writing software for a company that provided energy to the Pacific Northwest. He learned just how vital power grids are to everyday life, and “The Grid” serves as an important reminder that they really are engineering marvels.

“I think you would also come to see why modernizing the grid is so complex,” he writes, “and so critical for building our clean-energy future.”

My son received it as a Christmas gift, and stayed up all night finishing it. I ordered it the same day he told me.

Finally, a readable history of energy. Why does our grid look as it does?

The incredible role that Jimmy Carter played in the creation of the Department of Energy, the passage of two major pieces of legislation.
1. National Energy Act
2. PURPA

GRID traces the emergence of the California wind energy industry. According to the author, the industry emerged in spite of bad technology. The growth traced instead to enormous tax credits. The Federal tax credit was 25%, and California doubled it to 50%. Today Texas and California are by far the largest producers of wind energy in the US>

GRID traces energy from Thomas Edison to Thomas Unsall, who was his personal secretary. It was Unsall that formulated, and then implemented, an ambitious plan to centralize the nations power grid. Until he took over in Chicago, no one could figure out how to create, through government regulation and clever pricing, what today is an effective monopoly. What makes this even more remarkable: the monopolies are largely for-profit.

GRID traces the emergence of energy policy, beginning with President Jimmy Carter.

It includes the Energy Policy Act of 1978 and the Energy Policy Act of 1982.

Postscript: I just read the book a second time, and was stuck by its notes at the end, its index, and its general comprehensiveness.

I guess, for me, the big ideas in this book can be boiled down as follows:

LOAD IS DOWN: the planet is rife with innovations that are saving electricity – and most of them are coming without burden to the consumer (like turning thermostats down, wearing sweaters, etc.). So the demand for electricity peaked in 2007, and is unlikely to go higher until at least 2040.

GENERATION IS UP: At the same time, the ways to generate power better are increasing. Solar panels have dropped at least 50% in cost in a decade, while getting more effective. Wind turbines are excellent, and are continuing to improve. Coal generators are being slowly replaced by natural gas. Natural gas plants have desirable properties beyond generation, e.g. they can start up quickly and can come down quickly.

GENERATION IS BECOMING MORE RESILIENT AND MORE DISTRIBUTED. . After a decade of blackouts largely traceable to storms and poor line maintenance, the push is on for resilience, and it is working. The means to resilience is distributed generation (DG), which ultimately will prove to be very beneficial. However, because of regulatory roadblocks, perverse incentives, and a host of other complexities, it will be some time before the benefits of resilient DG are fully realized.

PREDICTING LOAD IS IMPROVING: Predicting load by five minute increments is improving. Smart meters and smart algorithms make it entirely plausible to predict load well 24 hours ahead, and extremely well 4 hours ahead.

PREDICTING GENERATION IS IMPROVING: the book tells horror stories about DG increasing instability and unpredictability. How can a utility plan for a surge due to a scorching sun? A big breeze? I find these horror stories to be suggestive of where this dysfunction will all end up, namely: prediction will improve dramatically through better weather forecasting, better detailed knowledge of all contributing generators.

A NEW MATCHING OF LOAD TO GENERATION IS VISIBLE. For all the horror stories, I think the future looks bright because matching predictable load to predictable generation is doable today, and will become a norm in the future once all the roadblocks are removed.

ASYNCHRONOUS POWER IS ALMOST HERE. Just as emails are asynchronous, while telephony is synchronous, in that same way, electricity has always been a synchronous technology – because there has never been a way of storing electricity. The world is moving fast toward asynchronous power because of batteries. When this happens, the world is going to change very fast.

TIME OF DAY PRICING WILL ACCELERATE ALL CHANGES. I am shocked at how pathetic time of day pricing is. Its ubiquitous – but pathetic. Once time of day pricing sends market signals about that discourage peak power use, so managers will take increasing advantage of using power (load) when it is cheapest, and avoiding power use (avoiding load) when it is most expensive, then we will begin to see thousands of innovative solutions for accomplishing this very simple goal.

Human connection lies at the heart of human well-being.

See NYT article below: if these facts are anywhere close to right, a community-based BeWell Center has an opportunity to do a whole lot of good by simply being an organizer of volunteer outreach. Low or no cost, big impact, great from a philanthropy POV. Meals on Wheels, elderly check-ins, classes, etc. “Research confirms our deepest intuition: Human connection lies at the heart of human well-being.”

“Social isolation is a growing epidemic — one that’s increasingly recognized as having dire physical, mental and emotional consequences. Since the 1980s, the percentage of American adults who say they’re lonely has doubled from 20 percent to 40 percent.

About one-third of Americans older than 65 now live alone, and half of those over 85 do. People in poorer health — especially those with mood disorders like anxiety and depression — are more likely to feel lonely. Those without a college education are the least likely to have someone they can talk to about important personal matters.
A wave of new research suggests social separation is bad for us. Individuals with less social connection have disrupted sleep patterns, altered immune systems, more inflammation and higher levels of stress hormones. One recent study found that isolation increases the risk of heart disease by 29 percent and stroke by 32 percent.
Another analysis that pooled data from 70 studies and 3.4 million people found that socially isolated individuals had a 30 percent higher risk of dying in the next seven years, and that this effect was largest in middle age.”

Research confirms our deepest intuition: Human connection lies at the heart of human well-being.

Iora Health – Update …$75 million Series D (moving toward 65+?)

Here is an update on Iora Health ….. the Cambridge, Mass innovator in Health Care supporting primary care services in 34 US locations. I first began tracking them when I was tracking Turntable in Ls Vegas, which is one of their sites.

Few points:

1. I see no big announcements about closings….interesting (there are rumors the Harken Health and Turntable will cease their partnership with Iora)
2. They just raised $75 million in a Series D financing ….. really interesting. The lead investor was the Singapore State fund Temasek … also interesting (big dogs). Apparently all existing investors stayed in the Series D – a good sign. Series C was $48 million, and the dollars before that (in A and B) were $13 million, I think. So that means that they have now raised $146 million…..that is a ton of money for a venture backed company! This tells me that they are telling investors what I believe to be true….that Year 1 hurts because the subscriber base in building but years 2 and onward can be profitable……but I have found no docs that say this.
3. They say they have 34 “primary care practices”…..looked at their backup for this. Here is what they (seem to) have:

18 sites are Medicare only Advantage Plans for 65+ only —— 16 sites partnering with Humana and 2 partnering with Tufts. So Humana is their big partner, but only to support their Medicare advantage plan for seniors.

1 corporate site for Hartford Health Care employees only

3 “fund” sites —— one for cooks and one for carpenters and one in Queens for “Grameen members”…..must be a credit union for each trade maybe?

6 sites with Harken/United Health ….. but very interesting that they are not listed on their official website…. they just take about 6 sites in ATL.

1 community site – Turntable in Las Vegas

2 pilot sites

31 sites total

4. My guess: the Series D raise of $75 million is going to be dedicated to Medicare Advantage plan expansion, through Humana, Tufts, and a few others. My hunch is that they do not see how to make the community model work…moreover, they see the ramp up as being needlessly painful. My hunch is that the Medicare Advantage model is profitable in Year 1, which investors would love! My hunch is that they have figured out to make these site smaller, more manageable, more care flow positive from the start, and that they are ultimately most profitable sites. Humana and other big dogs probably see them as a way to keep health care costs down……..while maintaining or improving senior outcomes. Anyone else have a guess or facts on this????

See my notes below:

===========NOTES on IORA Health ==========
October 16, 2016

US-based Iora Health has closed a $75-million Series D financing in a round led by Singapore state fund Temasek Holdings. Other investors who participated in the round include Iora Health’s existing institutional investors .406 Ventures, Flare Capital Partners, F-Prime Capital, GE Ventures, Khosla Ventures, Polaris Partners, and Rice Management Company. “We are honored to have Temasek join Iora on our journey to transform healthcare,” said Rushika Fernandopulle, MD, MPP, co-founder and CEO of Iora Health. “Temasek’s investment in Iora will accelerate our vision of fixing health care delivery which is one of the largest business and social problems, not just in the US, but globally.

Iora Health has built a different kind of health system that delivers high impact, relationship based care. With 34 primary care practices in 11 US markets, Iora serves diverse populations with an increasing focus on the most under-served and complex patients — including people aged 65 years and older on Medicare. Iora’s innovative model delivers an exceptional patient experience, with coordinated care that drives better clinical outcomes and significantly lower costs than the traditional healthcare system. Iora will use the new capital to drive further expansion and efficiencies in the model

Read more at: http://www.dealstreetasia.com/stories/55411-55411/

================

Iora Health lands $28M from GE Ventures, Khosla Ventures and others
Jan 26, 2015, 9:58am EST Revised Date/Time Publish Updated Jan 26, 2015, 2:06pm EST
Iora Health, a Cambridge startup aiming to “reinvent primary care” with a novel model for payment and delivery of care, said Monday that it raised $28 million in Series C funding from new investors including Foundation Medical Partners, Rice Management Co., GE Ventures and Khosla Ventures.

Existing investors included Boston’s .406 Ventures, Fidelity Biosciences and Boston-based Polaris Partners. Iora Health will use the additional financing to fund rapid expansion to continue delivering transformative health care, according to the company. The company has raised $48.2 million in total and plans to double its current workforce of 140.
Iora Health has developed a different health care operating system that starts with primary care, driving patient experience, engagement and clinical outcomes, while reducing overall health care costs, according to the company.
“We’re humbled by the great interest in our Series C financing and we are honored to have such a great group of new investors join our current ones.,” said Rushika Fernandopulle, co-founder and CEO of Iora Health, in a statement. “In the last four years, Iora Health has grown from a start up with an idea of how to improve health care to serving and improving the lives of thousands of patients across the U.S. We are excited to grow with this round to continue to deliver on our mission to restore humanity to health care.”

Iora Health currently manages eleven primary care practices across the U.S. for distinct patient populations including employee groups, Medicare Advantage patients and union members and their families. Iora sponsors include the Culinary Health Fund, Dartmouth College, the Freelancers Union, Grameen PrimaCare, Humana, King Arthur Flour, Lahey Health, the New England Carpenters Benefits Fund and Turntable Health.
The company, founded in 2011, last raised a $13 million round of funding two years ago from existing investors including Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh.

================== IORA Practices from their website =====

Source: http://www.iorahealth.com/practices/list-of-offices/

SPONSOR: CULINARY HEALTH FUND (serves workers who participate)
Las Vegas, NV 89104
SPONSOR: DARTMOUTH COLLEGE (Dartmouth Health Connect is a primary care practice in Hanover)
Hanover, NH 03755

SPONSOR: GRAMEEN PRIMACARE (for Grameen Members)
Queens, NY 11372

SPONSOR: HARTFORD HEALTHCARE (employees and family members)
Hartford, CT 06106

SPONSOR: Harken Health and United Health Care
Metro Atlanta (6)

SPONSOR: NEW ENGLAND CARPENTERS BENEFITS FUNDS
Dorchester, MA 02125

SPONSOR: TUFTS HEALTH PLAN (for 65+ members of Preferred HMO plans)
2 LOCATIONS
Medford, MA 02155
Hyde Park, MA, 02136

SPONSOR: HUMANA (All seem to support only Humana Medicare Advantage Plan)
16 LOCATIONS

Aurora, CO 80012
Littleton CO 80123
Arvada, CO 80003
Glendale, CO 80246
Lakewood, CO 80214

Federal Way WA 98003
Shoreline, WA 98133
Seattle, WA 98144
Renton, WA 98057
Tucson, AZ 85712 (2)
Mesa AZ 85206 (2)
Glendale, AZ 85302
Phoenix, AZ 85032 (2)

SPONSOR: TURNTABLE HEALTH
Las Vegas, NV 89101

Pilot Program Renaissance Health
Arlington, MA

PIlot Program Intensive Outpatient Care
Program Partner: The Boeing Company

Drew Elementary School and Edison

I visited the Drew Charter School on April 1, 2016, in the inspiring East Lake Community of Atlanta. East Lake has been wildly successful. The community itself has been a complete transformation, but – almost as importantly – its success has anchored the exciting turnarounds underway in surrounding Kirkwood, and Oakhurst in Decatur. The entire area south of Decatur and north of I-20 is booming – in large part thanks to East Lake and Tom and Anne Cousins.

It was a very proud moment for me – since Edison was elected as the operator of the school in the early year (I was Edison’s first Chief Operating Officer). The Edison model, to grow the school a grade at a time, is now almost fully realized at Drew: they have 11 grades and will open a twelfth grade next year!

And what a grand success it has been. Almost everyone involved credits the success of the school as being an essential component of Tom Cousin’s East Lake experiment. Of course Mr Cousins and his wife Anne, as well as Lillian and Greg Giornelli, deserve massive credit for their incredible multi-year commitment to this project. It was their commitment that made it all possible, including Drew.

Drew opened with a $17.5 million facility. What I saw was an even greater commitment – the junior/senior high school!

And a bit of history below:

Note this article from the ATL Business Chronicle was written in September, 1999. I joined The Edison Project as the Chief Operating Officer in January, 1996, and left Edison in September, 1999 – just as Drew was opening!

I took Edison through the first four operating years. The contracting and planning and budgeting was under my watch, but I never stayed to see it open (sadly).

So Drew was a fifth year Edison School (first year, 1995-1996, we had 4 schools; second year, 1996-1997, 12; third year, 1997-1998, 25; fourth, 1998-1999 51; fifth, 1999-2000 77. Note that Drew opened in temporary facilities for the 1999-2000 school year.

Note Shirley Franklin was Chair of the Charter School at the time.

From:
ATL Business Chronicle Article

Sep 6, 1999, 12:00am EDT Updated Sep 6, 1999, 12:00am

The Charles R. Drew Charter School has grabbed the attention of members of the East Lake community. Organizers hope it can keep that attention once it is open.

“If you look across the country in inner cities … people are very excited about public education,” said Shirley Franklin, chair of the East Lake Academy Charter School Board. “There’s a renewed interest in remodeling how public education operates.”

The state board of education unanimously approved the new charter school in August.

But work on the school is far from complete.

The school is slated to open next August in temporary quarters, first serving kindergarten through fifth-graders.

The former Drew Elementary School, which was closed a few years ago due to low enrollment, will be rebuilt. It is scheduled to open in its permanent location in August 2001.

The school will add one grade level per year, up to eighth grade in 2003.

The school likely will have an enrollment of about 850 in the $17.5 million facility.

Meeting multiple needs
A child development center serving community children up to the age of four is slated to be a part of the Drew Charter School. The charter school also will have an attached YMCA.

The YMCA “was something we’d been working [on] with Atlanta Public Schools and the YMCA since Day One. All three parties [see] the YMCA as a critical part of the redevelopment of the East Lake community,” said Greg Giornelli, executive director of the nonprofit East Lake Community Foundation, an effort driven by Atlanta developer Tom Cousins.

There are some immediate tasks to tackle in order to keep those redevelopment efforts on track.

The real estate closing on the Drew Elementary School property will take place in a few weeks, Giornelli said.
Topping the priority list for the charter school’s board meeting in September is discussion of a temporary site for the school and the status of the contract with The Edison Project, the nation’s largest education-management company, which will run the school for the charter foundation.

Rebuilding a community
The Drew School is just one example of the rebirth in East Lake and East Atlanta.

Cousins has been at work through his foundation, along with partners such as the Atlanta Housing Authority, to build a mixed-income housing development — the Villages of East Lake.

Besides being managed by The Edison Project and having its charter school board, the Drew School will be different in that there will be site-based decision-making, Giornelli said. There also will be an extended school day and year.
But to eradicate any misperceptions about the charter school’s identity — such as that it is some sort of private school — Giornelli stresses the partnership with Atlanta Public Schools.

“It never can be anything but an Atlanta public school. It is a unique school,” he said. “I don’t want to lose sight of the fact that this is a public school, and it’s very much a partnership effort. We are 100 percent accountable to the Atlanta Board of Education.”

The Atlanta Board of Education will pay $6,070 per student for the school’s first year. The expenditure will cover most of the school’s operating costs, except for transportation services and nutrition programs.

Drawing in residents
Atlanta school board member Mike Holiman, who represents District 3, which includes East Lake, hopes Drew’s set-up leads parents to become partners in the school’s success.
“I’ve seen it over and over again — when parents come in, elbow their way through the halls and take over, so to speak, things start happening,” Holiman said.
He said that he believes parents will be involved.
“I was at the initial public meeting when we started talking about the charter [last fall], and I think there were 70 or 80 people there at that first meeting,” he said.
“I can tell you, they are very interested in Drew being something special,” he added.

Developing a curriculum
The Edison Project was hired to initiate the education program, along with technology and management systems at the Drew School.

The Drew School’s curriculum will have an intensive focus on reading and math, with 90 minutes of language arts daily and 60 minutes of math instruction daily.

Franklin of the East Lake Academy Charter School Board gives high marks to the Edison-managed schools she has visited.

“I was impressed with all the people involved — the student body, parents, faculty — their focus on student performance,” Franklin said.

Edison manages schools in a number of places, including California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, North Carolina, Texas and Washington, D.C.

By this fall, there will be 77 schools under its management.

Changing the school calendar
Under current plans, the school day at the new Drew School will be one to two hours longer than it is at other public schools.

The first school year will be 185 days. There will be a minimum of 200 days in each subsequent school year.
With initiatives such as quarterly meetings between teachers and parents, a Parent Advisory Committee and a mentoring program, parental involvement will be heavily stressed.

Parental involvement
That won’t be a problem if parents voice the same enthusiasm for the school as Pamela Davis, who has lived in East Lake for 12 years and is a charter school board member.
Although her children, who are ages 10, 11, and 12, won’t be attending the school, Davis still is confident about Drew’s effects.

“The grades are supposed to improve,” Davis said. “The charter school is supposed to be … one-on-one.”
Davis isn’t nervous about the many eyes that will be focused on the charter school’s performance.

With the community undergoing a number of recent changes, East Lake has encountered scrutiny before. “We overcame that,” she said.

Of the school and community’s success, she added: “It only works if you make it work.”

Dubai and Well-Being

Dubai: Dubai Healthcare City , a health and wellness destination, today announced the launch of the world’s largest wellness concept in its Phase 2 expansion in Al Jadaf Dubai.

World’s Largest Wellness Village

Jan 25 2016

World’s largest wellness village to launch in Dubai Healthcare City Phase 2

Dubai: Dubai Healthcare City , a health and wellness destination, today announced the launch of the world’s largest wellness concept in its Phase 2 expansion in Al Jadaf Dubai.

Strategically located on the waterfront, the WorldCare Wellness Village will occupy an area equivalent to roughly the size of 16 football fields, and is estimated to be significantly larger in scale and offerings to current wellness properties in Europe and the US.

Tapping into the growing demand of people looking for evidence-based and holistic care, the wellness concept is driven by US-based WorldCare International and developed by the Dubai-based MAG Group. WorldCare is renowned for its online medical consultation service that digitally connects millions of members worldwide with over 20,000 specialists at world-class medical centers.
MR_Story

The Wellness Village concept contributes to the vision of Dubai Healthcare City to become an internationally recognized location of choice for quality healthcare and wellness services. With DHCC ‘s Phase 2 expansion, over land area of 22 million square feet, the free zone will drive the global trend of preventative healthcare taking into account local and regional healthcare demands and demographic changes.

Increasing access to preventative care is important to improve wellbeing and lower healthcare expenditure in the long term, said Her Excellency Dr Raja Al Gurg, Vice-Chairperson and Executive Director of Dubai Healthcare City Authority.
IN_READ

“By enabling access to wellness services, we are strengthening the health system and bringing patient centered care to the forefront. We are confident that Phase 2 will drive wellness tourism together with medical tourism, boosting Dubai’s diversified economy. It will bring together unique wellness concepts and specialized services such as rehabilitation, counseling, sports medicine and elderly care for both residents and visitors.”

The WorldCare Wellness Village will be anchored by a 100,000 square feet Wellness Center that will focus on prevention and management of diseases such as obesity, hypertension, diabetes and other physical conditions.

The Center will provide diagnosis and treatment plans, offering comprehensive two-to-six week medical programs built around patient education and lifestyle change. More than 100 healthcare and allied professionals are expected to work at the Center.
Nasser Menhall, Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of WorldCare International, said “We are proud to bring to Dubai a diversified wellness capability that will aggregate leading technologies and best practices in wellness programs in an unprecedented manner. Benefiting from economies of scale and our broad medical network, we hope to deliver a unique package of services that will raise the bar and set high standards.”

The Wellness Village, occupying 810,000 square feet of built up area (gross floor area /GFA) on a 900,000 square feet plot, is also conceptualized to include customized living spaces such as residential villas and apartments, as well as rental units to support long-term stay for both for local and foreign patients.

The eco-friendly living spaces will be designed to serve wellness and rehabilitation needs through features such as therapy zero-gravity pools, personalized spas, and rigorous exercise and diet facilities.

Bader Saeed Hareb, Chief Executive Officer (CEO), Investment Sector, Dubai Healthcare City , said, “We welcome our new wellness partner WorldCare who brings international systems and healthcare expertise that will strengthen what we already offer within the free zone. Unique concepts like WorldCare are a step in the right direction to ensure long-term sustainability and to develop a health and wellness destination that improves quality of life and sense of community.”

Hareb added, “As projects take shape, there will be a significant impact on the overall health of our communities, giving impetus to more opportunities to develop unique wellness concepts.”
-Ends-

About Dubai Healthcare City ( DHCC )
Dubai Healthcare City ( DHCC ) is a free zone committed to creating a health and wellness destination.

Since its launch in 2002 by His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, the free zone has worked towards its vision to become an internationally recognized location of choice for quality healthcare and an integrated center of excellence for clinical and wellness services, medical education and research.

Located in the heart of Dubai, the world’s largest healthcare free zone comprises two phases. Phase 1, dedicated to healthcare and medical education, occupies 4.1 million square feet in Oud Metha, and Phase 2, which is dedicated to wellness, occupies 22 million square feet in Al Jadaf, overlooking the historic Dubai Creek.

The free zone is governed by the Dubai Healthcare City Authority (DHCA) and regulated by the independent regulatory body, Dubai Healthcare City Authority – Regulation (DHCR), whose quality standards are accredited by the International Society for Quality in Healthcare (ISQua).

DHCC has close to 160 clinical partners including hospitals, outpatient medical centers and diagnostic laboratories across 150 plus specialties with licensed professionals from almost 90 countries, strengthening its medical tourism portfolio. Representing its network of support partners, close to 200 retail and non-clinical facilities serve the free zone.

DHCC is also home to academic institution the Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, part of the Mohammed Bin Rashid Academic Medical Center. The free zone’s integrated environment provides leverage for potential partners to set up operations to promote health and wellness.
To learn more, log on to www.dhcc.ae.

About WorldCare International, Inc.
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Donor-Advised Funds – MI

This reports on growth of donor-advised funds, now a $53 billion sub-sector of a philanthropy sector of $325 billion, as written by Howard Husock, Vice President, Manhattan Institute:

Latest from Manhattan Institute on Donor-Advised Funds

Husock is clearly expressing in vivid terms the virtues of NDAF’s – national donor-advised funds such as those provided by Schwab and Fidelity. He shows data that NDAF accounts (not funds) have expanded by 10,000,000+ since Congress ratified DAF’s in 2006. His argument is that these funds “democratize” philanthropy – making family-foundation-like systems and support available to a much broader base. He points out that their minimum fund requirements are much smaller than Community Foundations (sometimes they require as little as $5,000 to establish a NDAF account.)

Opposing 2014 Tax Code Revisions
In this report, he opposes the 2104 proposed change to the tax code, made the Congressman Camp, wherein all Donor-Advised Funds would be required to spend invested assets within five years. He cites arguments advanced for this change by a Boston College Professor of Law.

His argument is that DAF growth, perhaps from $53 billion to $100 billion+ by 2020, will be one of the reasons that philanthropy in the US, currently just below 2% of GDP (which is far ahead of other countries) could actually exceed 2%.

He has a special interest in NDAF’s. He actually is using data provided by them for the report:

“This paper uses data provided by Fidelity, Vanguard, and Schwab to compare giving patterns for donors in NDAF-based DAFs with those of community foundations (including from the latter’s general funds and DAF accounts).

The end of the report is optimistic:

“DAFs housed in NDAFs and major community foundations could signal a new era in U.S. mass philanthropy (one rivaling, say, the Community Chest / United Way movement of the 1920s). The potential thus exists for a large group of relatively small donors to make a big positive difference in the magnitude of what is already the world’s largest charitable giving sector.”