Category Archives: Education

Education, Learning, K-12 Education, Higher Education, Corporate Universities, Charter Schools, Privatization, Public Policy, Assessment, Formative Assessment, Summative Assessment, Common Core, Diagnostics, Special Education, Remediation, Personalization, Adaptive Learning Systems, Artificial Intelligence, Deep Learning, Image Recognition, Voice Recognition, Pattern Recognition, DeepFace

GPEE State of Education in GA

On November 9 the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education held a Critical Issues Forum on public perception polling and our new policy framework: EdQuest Georgia.

Michael Gilligan (Vice President, Strategic Initiatives) and Hans Voss (Senior Associate) from Achieve presented polling data on people’s public perceptions of education. You can find that data and presentation here.http://www.gpee.org/fileadmin/files/PDFs/Achieve_Georgia_report_deck_for_morning_presentation_110617.pdf

In addition to the public perception polling data, our Director of Policy & Research – Dr. Dana Rickman – presented EdQuest Georgia, the Partnership’s new research that identifies seven core areas that states and countries are using to achieve great success with their public education systems. You can find her presentation here.Rickman Presentation

If you were not able to attend and would like to watch the Forum in its entirety, you can view it on our YouTube page here.YouTube Link

For those of you who were able to make it to the Forum, we hope you found it to be informative. Thank you for your participation! Please share these links with anyone who is interested in improving public education in Georgia.

Drew Elementary School and Edison

I visited the Drew Charter School on April 1, 2016, in the inspiring East Lake Community of Atlanta. East Lake has been wildly successful. The community itself has been a complete transformation, but – almost as importantly – its success has anchored the exciting turnarounds underway in surrounding Kirkwood, and Oakhurst in Decatur. The entire area south of Decatur and north of I-20 is booming – in large part thanks to East Lake and Tom and Anne Cousins.

It was a very proud moment for me – since Edison was elected as the operator of the school in the early year (I was Edison’s first Chief Operating Officer). The Edison model, to grow the school a grade at a time, is now almost fully realized at Drew: they have 11 grades and will open a twelfth grade next year!

And what a grand success it has been. Almost everyone involved credits the success of the school as being an essential component of Tom Cousin’s East Lake experiment. Of course Mr Cousins and his wife Anne, as well as Lillian and Greg Giornelli, deserve massive credit for their incredible multi-year commitment to this project. It was their commitment that made it all possible, including Drew.

Drew opened with a $17.5 million facility. What I saw was an even greater commitment – the junior/senior high school!

And a bit of history below:

Note this article from the ATL Business Chronicle was written in September, 1999. I joined The Edison Project as the Chief Operating Officer in January, 1996, and left Edison in September, 1999 – just as Drew was opening!

I took Edison through the first four operating years. The contracting and planning and budgeting was under my watch, but I never stayed to see it open (sadly).

So Drew was a fifth year Edison School (first year, 1995-1996, we had 4 schools; second year, 1996-1997, 12; third year, 1997-1998, 25; fourth, 1998-1999 51; fifth, 1999-2000 77. Note that Drew opened in temporary facilities for the 1999-2000 school year.

Note Shirley Franklin was Chair of the Charter School at the time.

From:
ATL Business Chronicle Article

Sep 6, 1999, 12:00am EDT Updated Sep 6, 1999, 12:00am

The Charles R. Drew Charter School has grabbed the attention of members of the East Lake community. Organizers hope it can keep that attention once it is open.

“If you look across the country in inner cities … people are very excited about public education,” said Shirley Franklin, chair of the East Lake Academy Charter School Board. “There’s a renewed interest in remodeling how public education operates.”

The state board of education unanimously approved the new charter school in August.

But work on the school is far from complete.

The school is slated to open next August in temporary quarters, first serving kindergarten through fifth-graders.

The former Drew Elementary School, which was closed a few years ago due to low enrollment, will be rebuilt. It is scheduled to open in its permanent location in August 2001.

The school will add one grade level per year, up to eighth grade in 2003.

The school likely will have an enrollment of about 850 in the $17.5 million facility.

Meeting multiple needs
A child development center serving community children up to the age of four is slated to be a part of the Drew Charter School. The charter school also will have an attached YMCA.

The YMCA “was something we’d been working [on] with Atlanta Public Schools and the YMCA since Day One. All three parties [see] the YMCA as a critical part of the redevelopment of the East Lake community,” said Greg Giornelli, executive director of the nonprofit East Lake Community Foundation, an effort driven by Atlanta developer Tom Cousins.

There are some immediate tasks to tackle in order to keep those redevelopment efforts on track.

The real estate closing on the Drew Elementary School property will take place in a few weeks, Giornelli said.
Topping the priority list for the charter school’s board meeting in September is discussion of a temporary site for the school and the status of the contract with The Edison Project, the nation’s largest education-management company, which will run the school for the charter foundation.

Rebuilding a community
The Drew School is just one example of the rebirth in East Lake and East Atlanta.

Cousins has been at work through his foundation, along with partners such as the Atlanta Housing Authority, to build a mixed-income housing development — the Villages of East Lake.

Besides being managed by The Edison Project and having its charter school board, the Drew School will be different in that there will be site-based decision-making, Giornelli said. There also will be an extended school day and year.
But to eradicate any misperceptions about the charter school’s identity — such as that it is some sort of private school — Giornelli stresses the partnership with Atlanta Public Schools.

“It never can be anything but an Atlanta public school. It is a unique school,” he said. “I don’t want to lose sight of the fact that this is a public school, and it’s very much a partnership effort. We are 100 percent accountable to the Atlanta Board of Education.”

The Atlanta Board of Education will pay $6,070 per student for the school’s first year. The expenditure will cover most of the school’s operating costs, except for transportation services and nutrition programs.

Drawing in residents
Atlanta school board member Mike Holiman, who represents District 3, which includes East Lake, hopes Drew’s set-up leads parents to become partners in the school’s success.
“I’ve seen it over and over again — when parents come in, elbow their way through the halls and take over, so to speak, things start happening,” Holiman said.
He said that he believes parents will be involved.
“I was at the initial public meeting when we started talking about the charter [last fall], and I think there were 70 or 80 people there at that first meeting,” he said.
“I can tell you, they are very interested in Drew being something special,” he added.

Developing a curriculum
The Edison Project was hired to initiate the education program, along with technology and management systems at the Drew School.

The Drew School’s curriculum will have an intensive focus on reading and math, with 90 minutes of language arts daily and 60 minutes of math instruction daily.

Franklin of the East Lake Academy Charter School Board gives high marks to the Edison-managed schools she has visited.

“I was impressed with all the people involved — the student body, parents, faculty — their focus on student performance,” Franklin said.

Edison manages schools in a number of places, including California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Kansas, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Jersey, North Carolina, Texas and Washington, D.C.

By this fall, there will be 77 schools under its management.

Changing the school calendar
Under current plans, the school day at the new Drew School will be one to two hours longer than it is at other public schools.

The first school year will be 185 days. There will be a minimum of 200 days in each subsequent school year.
With initiatives such as quarterly meetings between teachers and parents, a Parent Advisory Committee and a mentoring program, parental involvement will be heavily stressed.

Parental involvement
That won’t be a problem if parents voice the same enthusiasm for the school as Pamela Davis, who has lived in East Lake for 12 years and is a charter school board member.
Although her children, who are ages 10, 11, and 12, won’t be attending the school, Davis still is confident about Drew’s effects.

“The grades are supposed to improve,” Davis said. “The charter school is supposed to be … one-on-one.”
Davis isn’t nervous about the many eyes that will be focused on the charter school’s performance.

With the community undergoing a number of recent changes, East Lake has encountered scrutiny before. “We overcame that,” she said.

Of the school and community’s success, she added: “It only works if you make it work.”

Electric Buses

Article on Electric Buses reprinted below

I have some comments after the article – but first, here is the article from the link above:

All-Electric School Bus Hits the Road

Big yellow waits in the wings for its smaller counterpart to make (electric) inroads.
by Katherine Tweed
March 04, 2014

When it comes to energy efficiency, schools are a relatively easy target. There is a natural synergy between educating the next generation and teaching sustainability and efficiency, whether it’s telling kindergartners to turn off lights when they leave a room or running sophisticated energy efficiency competitions between graduate school departments. Schools often own the buildings they occupy, making it easier to swallow long-term paybacks for efficiency retrofits.

When it comes to moving students to and from school, however, there has been less progress. The nearly half a million school buses in the U.S. are inherently more efficient than single-car drivers, but transportation efficiency gains end there for many school districts. Most youngsters (and bummed-out high schoolers without wheels of their own) are waiting at street corners and the end of driveways for practically the same yellow bus their parents rode to school (the addition of seat belts notwithstanding).

Not so for one group of kids in San Joaquin Valley, Calif. Starting in February, the Kings Canyon Unified School District becameone of the first school districts in the nation to order multiple all-electric school bus to transport students. The bus is a modification of Trans Tech Bus’ SST model, with an electric powertrain from Motiv Power Systems, which also provides electric powertrains to other heavy-duty vehicles by dropping its new technology into existing chassis. A few years ago, Smith announced the availability of an electric school bus with Trans Tech, but it did not gain success in the marketplace. 

“In this way, we are answering the call of the transportation industry to build reliable EV trucks that fit seamlessly into the existing diesel truck manufacturing and service infrastructure,” Jim Castelaz, founder and CEO of Motiv, said in a statement. “We are absolutely thrilled to see the Kings Canyon all-electric school bus on its route, transporting students, without exposing them to diesel exhaust. I hope that by the time my daughter is ready to go to school, she will be able to ride clean, zero-emission school buses like this one.” 

Many states across the U.S. already have anti-idling laws that apply to school buses to cut down on air pollution. But there is often an exception when the buses need to be powered on to run the heat or air conditioning. The federal government has also ensured that school buses will have to become more efficient in coming years. President Obama has introduced the first fuel efficiency standards for medium and heavy-duty vehicles during his time in office, which will now become even more stringent.

Even with the more efficient use of the buses and gains in gas mileage, they could still be an attractive fit for electric powertrains. Like other fleet vehicles that have gone electric, such as Proterra buses in San Antonio, Motiv’s garbage trucks in Chicago or FedEx’s delivery trucks, school buses have prescribed routes that can work well with a limited battery range.

School buses often sit idle for part of the mid-day and overnight, which could allow them to participate in demand response or frequency regulation markets, as that option becomes more widely available. Frequency regulation might be more realistic than demand response, since school buses are on the roads during the afternoons when peaks usually happen in summer. In PJM and Texas’s ERCOT, there are already pilots to allow fleet EVs to participate in the energy markets. One Chinese electric bus manufacturer operating in California is calling for utility rate redesign that would further incentivize electric transportation.

And then, of course there are, the children. Many parents don’t like the idea of their kids sucking diesel exhaust as they climb on and off a bus every day? In theory, it sounds like a win, but some school buses have already gotten much cleaner than they were a generation ago, and the electric school bus comes in at about twice the cost of a traditional diesel bus. Like other heavy-duty vehicles, there are also other low-emission options, such as natural gas, to choose from.

“Kings Canyon Unified School District has taken major strides to reduce diesel particulate emissions by as much as 85 percent with the installation of diesel particulate filters and the use of low-sulfur diesel fuel years before the mandates, plus converting one-third of our school bus fleet to clean-burning natural gas,” Jason Flores, transportation director for KCUSD, said in a statement. “Going electric with these new green school buses is just one more important step in KCUSD’s ongoing portfolio of measures to protect our children, serve our community and be good servants of our environment.” 

Like other EVs, one advantage of the electric school bus is that its lifetime operating cost is far lower than that of its conventional counterpart. If diesel prices continue to rise, the savings only get better, especially if battery breakthroughs can lower the cost of electric transportation.

“The buses cost about twice as much as a comparable gas bus, but cost one-eighth as much to fuel and one-third as much to maintain,” said Castelaz. “Over the life of a school bus, two to three times the cost of the vehicle is spent on fuel and maintenance.”

Electric municipal buses are more common, but all-electric school buses have struggled to make inroads. In the 1990s, Westinghouse tried developing technology but it was never commercialized. Some other all-electric school buses have been piloted but not used for daily transport. One all-electric school bus was put into operation at Mid-Del Technology Center school in Oklahoma. It is unclear as to whether it is still in operation. There are also other efforts underway in New York City and Chicago to test out electric school buses. 

The pilot for the buses in California was funded with $400,000 from the California Air Resources Board AB 118 Air Quality Improvement Program Electric School Bus Demonstration Project. The smaller buses are outfitted with four or five battery packs for a range of 80 to 100 miles. According to Motive, when incentives for zero-emission buses are combined with battery leasing, the buses cost the same or less than conventional buses, making the long-term cost far lower.

The goal, however, is not just to electrify smaller buses, but to enable big yellow to go green too. Castelaz said there has been some interest from fleets in full-size electric bus fleets, and Motiv has the technical capabilities since it has outfitted other heavy-duty fleet vehicles, such as other buses, with electric powertrains.

The smaller buses were a natural place to start, according to John Clements, retired director of transportation for KCUSD, who is now an active clean fuels advocate in California. He noted that larger buses could be an option if there is interest based on the pilots. Kings Canyon has two buses, and federal highway funds will purchase two more for California pilots.

“They will be available to public school districts to try out at no risk to them,” said Clements. “In this way, we hope to educate districts about going electric and make it easy for them to experience for themselves.”

=============== ARTICLE ENDS HERE================

The key is:

“The buses cost about twice as much as a comparable gas bus, but cost one-eighth as much to fuel and one-third as much to maintain … Over the life of a school bus, two to three times the cost of the vehicle is spent on fuel and maintenance.”

So a moon shot for the US is: could we create an electric bus industry that, along with natural gas busses, eliminated diesel busses in the US by 2030? Could 50% of all busses by 2030 by electric?

The specific objective would be to scale the industry so the capital is 1.5x rather than 2x, and the operating costs are one-eight or less, not one-third to one-eighth.

The point is – this could be great economics for a school district. Let’s take an example. If a school bus cost $150,000 instead of $100,000 (for example), and operating costs became $1,000 instead of $10,0000 per year, then the savings of $9,000 would become a savings of $90,000 over ten years – more than paying for the extra capital.

So could there ever be a day when:

1.Public Service Commissions have a “electric school bus rate” – available only at EV charging stations of school busses (which might even have proprietary charging connections to ensure that only school busses could access the charge).
2. Authorize bonding authorities to have a “electric school bus bond” – which would allow school districts to issue 15 year bonds dedicated to buying electric busses at tax-free municipal bond rates (which are very, very low – like 2% interest or less). These bonds might have a sweetener that would make them very attractive to bond-holders – a kicker that gave bondholders half of the revenue received from the sale of electricity by busses back to utilities during peak period.
3. Authorize school districts to enter into performance contracts that pledged all operating savings for 15 years in exchange for upfront capital to buy the buses. This is an exciting option, possibly an alternative to bonds. If option 1 pricing would be put in place, smart money might actually happily offer funds this way!

The School Bus Rate would mandate utilities to charge pennies (possibly nothing?????) for off peak charging and double or triple rates for peak charging (to ensure that chargers were turned off during peak time). It would also specify a (high) price for electricity that utilities would buy back electricity from school buses during peak hours – after school hours.

So school boards, mayors, governors and other electeds would proclaim that they are using a fleet of batteries in their state to shave the state’s peak – and thereby avoiding massive capital costs for new generating capacity that ultimately is charged to taxpayers.

Arts Education

Steven J. Tepper is the dean of the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts at Arizona State University, the nation’s largest, comprehensive design and arts school at a research university. . He was the keynote speaker at the annual luncheon today of the Metropolitan Atlanta Art Fund.

He had some provocative data to share. He was quoting from SNAAP.

His context was the explosion of arts non-for-profits – from 300 in the 1950’s to over 130,000 today.

Dr. Tepper is convinced that education in the arts is poorly understood, and has data to prove it. Too many people, he says, are skeptical about the careers that are possible from an arts education. In fact, many of the competencies developed in an arts education are precisely what employers in the 21st century are looking for – especially creativity. His conclusions:

– “The MFA is the new MBA”
– “The ‘Copyright Industries’ are booming…..they are 3X the size of the construction industry”.
– “the 21st century needs ‘design thinking”.

After the luncheon, I looked him up at ASU. Here is what he has to say – in his own words:

Welcome to the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts, the largest comprehensive design and arts school in the nation, located within a dynamic 21st-century research university.

With 4,700 students, more than 675 faculty and faculty associates, 135 degrees and a tradition of top-ranked programs, we are committed to redefining the 21st-century design and arts school. Our college is built on a combination of disciplines unlike any other program in the nation, comprising schools of art; arts, media + engineering; design; film, dance and theatre; and music; as well as the ASU Art Museum.

The Institute is dedicated to the following design principles:

Creativity is a core 21st-century competency. Our graduates develop the ability to be generative and enterprising, work collaboratively within and across artistic fields, and generate non-routine solutions to complex problems. With this broad exposure to creative thinking and problem solving, our graduates are well prepared to lead in every arena of our economy, society and culture.

Design and the arts are critical resources for transforming our society. Artists must be embedded in their communities and dedicate their creative energy and talent to building, reimagining and sustaining our world. Design and the arts must be socially relevant and never viewed as extras or as grace notes. The Herberger Institute is committed to placing artists and arts-trained graduates at the center of public life.
The Herberger Institute is committed to enterprise and entrepreneurship. For most college graduates today, the future of work is unpredictable, non-linear and constantly evolving. A recent study found that 47 percent of current occupations will likely not exist in the next few decades. At the Herberger Institute, our faculty, students and graduates are inventing the jobs and the businesses of the future; reimagining how art and culture gets made and distributed; and coming up with new platforms and technology for the exchange of culture and the enrichment of the human experience. The legendary author and expert on city life Jane Jacobs talks about the abundance of “squelchers” — parents, educators, managers and leaders who tend to say no to new ideas. At the Herberger Institute, there are no squelchers. We embrace the cardinal rule of improvisation — always say: “Yes, and…”
Every person, regardless of social background, deserves an equal chance to help tell our nation’s and our world’s stories. Our creative expression defines who we are, what we aspire to and how we hope to live together. At the Herberger Institute, we are committed to projecting all voices – to providing an affordable education to every student who has the talent and the desire to boldly add their creative voice to the world’s evolving story.

Effectiveness requires excellence. We know that our ability to solve problems, build enterprises and create compelling and socially relevant design and art requires high levels of mastery. By being the best in our chosen fields, we can stretch ourselves and our talents to make a difference in the world.

Recently, as part of a weekly installation on campus, a Herberger Institute student hand-lettered the slogan “Here’s to the dreamers and the doers” in chalk on an outdoor blackboard, and we were able to use this for the incoming freshman class t-shirt. Whether you are an architect, designer, artist, performer, filmmaker, media engineer or creative scholar, the Herberger Institute is a place to dream. But unlike the misrepresentation of the artist and scholar as lost in a cloud, our faculty and students “make stuff happen” and leave their well-chiseled mark on the world. Come tour our concert and performance halls, art and design studios, exhibition spaces, dance studios, scene shops, classrooms, clinics and digital culture labs, and you will see the power of dreamers and doers.
If you are reading this message, you are implicated as a potential collaborator. Bring us your talents, your ideas and your passion — we will dream and do great things together.
Enthusiastically yours,

Steven J. Tepper

Dean
Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts
Arizona State University

The Reality Project

Here is an amazing compilation of a certain category of world events, by Leon Newton. Newton obviously has a POV, which can be independently understood. But what I find amazing is the diligence of the compilation.

Thanks to my friend Usman Mirza for letting me know about this.

Leon explains his work below:

“The Messengers” which is a compilation of the works of many critical thinkers over the years who have tried to explain existing conditions or to warn us of future conditions if we continued to do what we are doing.

The Reality Project File
Messages in History

“2015 Headlines” contains articles, videos and audio presentations from around the world. It is different from most other news sources in that it includes Energy as a separate category. At the bottom of the “Headlines” sheet are four videos (selected from “The Messengers”) which, I believe describe our present economic predicament.

Headlines in history

“The Reality Project Power Flow Chart”. This is my interpretation of how C. Wright Mills described the roles of the Power Elite, Corporations and governmental entities it also includes many of the entities that were created by the Powell Memo, including the propaganda machine that has so divided this country.

The Realty Project Flow Chart

Fab Labs

Another great idea from Clay Johnson: let’s create the first “Fab Lab” in Atlanta – at Serenbe.

“Fab” is short for “fabrication” – and a Fab Lab is part of a global network of Fab Labs, initiated by the MIT Center of Bits and Atoms to encourage fabrication by lay people.

The idea is that making things with tools, particular things that are a part of the emerging digital economy, is much easier and much more fun than people think. Participants can learn a lot, and create a lot.

Reference: www.fabfoundation.org

Serenbe needs a Fab Lab!

A very rough guess was made to answer the question: what would it cost to make this happen? Clay’s best guess is $100K.

Where would the Fab Lab be housed? Not clear at this time, but surely we can find a great place.

The section below of the WWW.Fabfoundation.org website makes it clear that there are four criteria, all of which we can meet:

1. Must be open to the public
2. Must subscribe to the FabLab charter
3. Must have a common set of tools and processes*
4. Must participate in the global network (there is a Fab Lab academy, and annual global summit, etc)

* a laser cutter for 2D/3D design and fabrication, a high precision milling machine for making circuits and molds for casting, a vinyl cutter for making flexible circuits and crafts, and a fairly sophisticated electronics workbench for prototyping circuits and programming micro controllers. Optional: large wood routing machine for furniture and housing applications and 3D printers.

From the Website
Who/What qualifies as a Fab Lab?
The four qualities and requirements listed below altogether create an enabling environment that we call a Fab Lab. If your lab effort meets all these criteria, “Welcome!” If you feel you are in synchrony with the Fab Lab form and spirit, please use our logo in your fundraising efforts, and keep us informed of your progress. Please register your lab effort or new fab lab on the world map here. Here are the criteria we currently use for defining a Fab Lab:

First and foremost, public access to the Fab Lab is essential. A Fab Lab is about democratizing access to the tools for personal expression and invention. So a Fab Lab must be open to the public for free or in-kind service/barter at least part of the time each week, that’s essential.

Fab Labs support and subscribe to the Fab Lab charter: http://fab.cba.mit.edu/about/charter/

Fab Labs have to share a common set of tools and processes. A prototyping facility is not the equivalent of a Fab Lab. A 3D printer is not a Fab Lab. The idea is that all the labs can share knowledge, designs, and collaborate across international borders. If I make something here in Boston and send you the files and documentation, you should be able to reproduce it there, fairly painlessly. If I walk into a Fab Lab in Russia, I should be able to do the same things that I can do in Nairobi, Cape Town, Delhi, Amsterdam or Boston Fab Labs. The critical machines and materials are identified in this list: http://fab.cba.mit.edu/about/fab/inv.html and there’s a list of open source software and freeware that we use online as well (embedded in Fab Academy modules here: http://academy.cba.mit.edu/classes/ ) But essentially it’s the processes and the codes and the capabilities that are important. So you want a laser cutter for 2D/3D design and fabrication, a high precision milling machine for making circuits and molds for casting, a vinyl cutter for making flexible circuits and crafts, a fairly sophisticated electronics workbench for prototyping circuits and programming microcontrollers, and if you can possibly find the funds, you’ll want the large wood routing machine for furniture and housing applications. We are also testing fairly inexpensive, but robust and with fair resolution 3D printers—the most current favorite is listed in the inventory.

Fab Labs must participate in the larger, global Fab Lab network, that is, you can’t isolate yourself. This is about being part of a global, knowledge-sharing community. The public videoconference is one way to do connect. Attending the annual Fab Lab meeting is another. FAB10 is in Barcelona this year, July 2-8. Collaborating and partnering with other labs in the network on workshops, challenges or projects is another way. Participating in Fab Academy is yet another way.

Lunch with Jay Forrester

Meeting Notes
Jay Forrester and Tenley Albright
MIT
October 13, 2011

These notes record a lunch between John Reid, Tenley Albright, and Jay Forrester at MIT.
Tenley Albright is legendary. The first US woman to win an Olympics Gold in figure skating, Surgeon at Harvard Medical for 23 years, and the Director of the MIT Center for Collaborative Initiatives.

Forrester is beyond legendary. I interned for him in 1973…what an honor! He is an MIT Institute Professor Emeritus – 95 years old.

He:

Invented and patented core memory – the random access memory that for years was the basis for modern digital computing
Led the MIT Digital Computer Lab from 1946 to 1951, and supervised the design and construction of “Worldwind I”, one of the first high speed computers.
Led the Digital Computer Divison of MIT’s Lincoln Lab from 1952 to 1956, where he led the team that designed Air Force SAGE – for continental air defense.
Has been widely honored globally and by MIT and by professional associations.
Was associated with Norbert Weiner and John von Neuumann, and others who are widely recognized as fathers of digital computing. At lunch, he said that Weiner was a big ego, and dominated every conversation in a rude way; he said von Neumann was the big brain that made it happen.
invented systems dynamics, starting with “industrial dynamics”, followed by “world dynamics”, and;
ultimately enabled his students Dennis and Donnella Meadows, along with Jorgen Randers, to publish “Limits to Growth” – which is widely credited with getting the world’s attention on the environmmental issues facing the world.
At lunch, Professor Forrester, whose acuity matches any fifty year old, told us of his conviction that systems dynamics hold the key to reform in K-12 education – and that he has the results to prove it.
He told us:

that D-4893 documents 20 years of history in testing this pedagogical approach.
that Creative Leaning Exchange is a foundation created to facilitate information exchange among participating schools
that $100 million is needed to fund the next ten years of experimentation
that simulations in the classroom are exciting students and teachers alike, and form the basis for an exciting new form of classroom engaagement which focuses on the connectivity between subjects rather than the differences.
then systems dynamics are a “language” for the classroom that – once mastered – creates a new fluency for concepts that are central to issues facing businesses and societies alike.
D-4895-1 says that this type of education allows student to “gain a well-rounded confidence for managing their lives and the situations they encounter.”
He says, in D-4895, “education must reverse the trends of the last century toward more and more specialization.” “a person with an understanding of systems sees the common elements of diverse settings rather than focusing on the differences”.
“the innovative personallity believes there are reasons for why things happen”‘
“computer simulation modeling is a repeating process of trial and error.”
“in complex systems,, there are many interconnected feedback loops”
“in simple systems, the cause of failure is clear. In complex systems, causes are more obscure; it is not evident that we have caused our own crisis, so, there is a strong tendency to blame others. However, the practice of blaming others diverts attention from the real cause of trouble.”
“system dynamic modeling is learning by doing”
“I bellieve that immersion in such activee learning can change mental models”

he told us that three software programs are at the basis of the approach. STELLA is simple to use. A second is amiable for business application. A third is VEN-SIM, which is the most powerful (this is what he uses).
He has published “Road Maps”for system learning through the Creative Learning Exchange”