Monthly Archives: March 2018

SmartWatch Technology Reliably Detects Afib

The quantified self movement strikes again!

CREDIT: Cleveland Clinic Article on Detection of Afib via SmartWatch

Smartwatch Technology Reliably Detects Afib Prior to Cardioversion
Study suggests a role for KardiaBand when paired with physician review

A newly FDA-approved smartwatch accessory can record heart rhythm and successfully differentiate atrial fibrillation (AF) from normal sinus rhythm (SR) through an automated algorithm, according to a Cleveland Clinic investigation. The study, which will be presented March 11 at the American College of Cardiology’s 67th Scientific Session, also showed that the accuracy of interpretation gets even better when the accessory is supported by physician review.
The findings suggest that the wearable technology, known as KardiaBand™, can help screen patients before presentation for elective cardioversion to avoid unnecessary procedures, among other potential uses.
KardiaBand, which consists of a software app for an Apple Watch® and a sensor band that replaces one of the watch’s straps, provides a 30-second recording of an ECG rhythm strip when the wearer places a thumb on the sensor band. The app contains an algorithm for automated detection of AF.
“Our objective was to determine how accurately KardiaBand and its algorithm can differentiate AF from sinus rhythm compared with physician-interpreted 12-lead ECGs,” says senior author Khaldoun Tarakji, MD, MPH, a Cleveland Clinic electrophysiologist. In November 2017, the device became the first smartwatch healthcare accessory to be approved by the FDA, “but we wanted to test it ourselves to determine how well it would perform in clinical practice,” Dr. Tarakji explains.
Study essentials
To that end, he and Cleveland Clinic colleagues prospectively enrolled 100 consecutive patients (mean age, 68 ± 11 years) with chronic AF who were scheduled to undergo cardioversion. Upon presenting for the cardioversion procedure, all patients were given a KardiaBand-equipped smartwatch and trained in its use, after which they underwent traditional ECG assessment and a 30-second KardiaBand recording. If cardioversion was still indicated, they underwent ECG and KardiaBand testing after the procedure. KardiaBand recordings were then compared with the physician-reviewed ECGs and also reviewed by two blinded electrophysiologists, with these readings compared to ECG interpretations.
Eight patients did not undergo cardioversion because they presented in SR; these patients were excluded. Among the remaining patients, a total of 169 pairs of ECG and KardiaBand recordings were available for comparison (each patient had two before and two after cardioversion).
Key findings
• Of the 169 pre-cardioversion KardiaBand recordings, 57 fell out as “unclassified,” meaning that the KardiaBand algorithm did not draw a conclusion of either AF or SR.
• Among the remaining 112 pairs of recordings, the reviewing electrophysiologists determined that the KardiaBand algorithm correctly detected AF with 93 percent sensitivity and 84 percent specificity compared with ECG.
• When the blinded reviewers bypassed the automated algorithm and interpreted each patient’s KardiaBand strips against his or her ECG, sensitivity rose to 99 percent and specificity was 83 percent. Further, in the 57 unclassified cases, the reviewers were able to use the strips to correctly diagnose AF versus SR with 100 percent sensitivity and 80 percent specificity.
“This study shows that KardiaBand provides excellent sensitivity and good specificity in identifying AF,” says Dr. Tarakji. “The numbers improve further with physician overview of these recordings, indicating that even unclassified KardiaBand strip recordings could be of value to reading physicians.”
Smart devices demand smart use
KardiaBand carries the benefit of enabling patients to record their rhythm at any time, as opposed to only when they are wearing a Holter monitor or at a physician’s office. “We can catch intermittent episodes when they happen, and we’re not limited to a specific duration of monitoring time,” Dr. Tarakji says. He adds that wearable devices like this can also reduce time spent responding to false alarms if a recording taken at the same time shows normal rhythm.
Yet many questions remain about how KardiaBand and similar products may ultimately be used in practice. Dr. Tarakji cites a few examples:
• Which patients are best suited to this technology? For many patients dealing with AF, KardiaBand can provide reassurance when they need it. But for others, having constant access to their ECG data may lead them to check their rhythm obsessively, raising anxiety. “In general, however, patients value the instant feedback they get,” Dr. Tarakji observes.
• Do physicians have the IT infrastructure in place to make these devices part of their practice? Wearable devices can mean a flood of event reports to clinicians’ email boxes. At Cleveland Clinic, information from patients’ KardiaBands bypasses the email system and feeds into a cloud-computing platform that physicians can access anytime.
• How should clinicians respond to short episodes, particularly in asymptomatic patients? “We currently have a gap in our clinical knowledge about whether brief, random episodes that are asymptomatic warrant anticoagulation or not,” Dr. Tarakji explains, adding that ongoing studies are trying to address this important question.
“Future studies will focus on how we can use these smart devices intelligently to make sure they’re improving quality of care rather than just producing noise for physicians,” he observes.
A parallel goal, he says, is to ensure that the devices provide value by making care delivery more efficient. Noting that patients currently need to pay for KardiaBand out of pocket, Dr. Tarakji says that “developing a richer body of research evidence is the best way we can demonstrate cost-effectiveness to healthcare payers.”
Tech like this can’t be ignored
Indeed, KardiaBand could prove cost-effective by allowing patients who are in SR to avoid needless trips for elective procedures, such as in the case of the eight patients in the study who were found to be in SR when they presented for cardioversion and did not require the procedure. Other potential uses of KardiaBand for the longitudinal management of AF patients could well prove cost-effective too.
Regardless of how quickly such cost-effectiveness evidence may come, Dr. Tarakji says clinicians cannot be passive in the face of technologies like KardiaBand. “Patients will come to us with new products, and we can’t turn away,” he observes. “We need to test these products and find ways of responding to the information they deliver in a way that improves patient outcomes, all while remaining mindful of both patient and physician satisfaction.”
The researchers report that KardiaBand’s manufacturer, AliveCor, provided smartwatches for the study but was not involved in the study’s design, implementation, data analysis or interpretation.

Well-Being – Real Time Revisited

NOTE: This post revisits a post titled “Well-Being Real Time”. The original post was May, 2014, and can be found at:

Well-Being – Real Time Revisited

Well-being is arguably the central mega-trend of the 21st century. As we look to the future, we have an obligation to “unpack” this dense concept, and find its essential component parts.

We describe these components here as “ACE” – ACT, CARE, and EAT. The wish we have for ourselves and for others is to be well. “Be Well” is our salutation and our call to actions.

How far out are we looking?

The future is now. ACE is here – together with real time measuring and monitoring. ACE is our pathway to greater and greater levels of personal well-being.

ACE measuring and monitoring will be supported by all elements of the quantified self movement. FitBit, Apple Watch, and so many other new monitoring devices will allow us to to bring personal well-being into a real-time modality.

ACE represents three pillars, each deceptively simple:

A – ACT: ACT is short for activity. The call to action is “stay active”. Well-being activity has physical activity at its center, but the pillar also embraces social activity, and activities of the mind. Staying active is a critical element of being well.
C – CARE: CARE is short for well-being care. The call to action is “care for yourself” and “care for others.”Well-being care of course has health care at its center, but there is so much more. e.g. genomics, massage, essential oils, acupuncture, etc. “Caring for myself” and “Caring for others” are elements of this pillar. “Preventive care” regular check-ups, colonoscopies after age 50, mammograms, pre-natal care for expecting mothers, etc.
E – EAT: EAT is short for eating and drinking. The call to action is “Eat well.” Well-being eating is the exploration of how what we eat and drink contributes to our well-being.

As simple as these pillars appear, each is complex: deep enough for a life-time of focus. Each represents bodies of research, skills, capabilities, and areas of professional endeavor. All together, these pillars represent pathway that each of us will follow as we attain greater and greater levels of personal well-being.



A – ACT (walking, running, calories burned etc)

Staying active is a critical element of being well. Well-being activity has physical activity at its center: sports, walking, lifting, climbing, yoga, and all of the other activities that light up a FitBit. The pillar also embraces activity of other kinds, e.g. social activity, and activities of the mind.


Well-being care is all about promoting health. Of course, it has health care at its center, but there is so much more. e.g. mental health, addictive behaviors, massage, genomics, essential oils, acupuncture, etc.

“Caring for myself” and “Caring for others” are elements of this pillar. “Preventive care”, eldercare and aging, palliative care are included, but so are regular check-ups, colonoscopies after age 50, mammograms, pre-natal care for expecting mothers, etc.

The ability to routinely monitor vital signs at home or at the office will be a part of this pillar. Lab work – including saliva, blood, and stool samples, will be more real time, more regular and less expensive. These trends will be one of the keys to progress in the care pillar. On the innovation side of this pillar will be many technologies, but breakthroughs in genomics will certainly be high on the list. Telemedicine is another innovation that will alter access to well-being care.

Predictive modeling will be more relevant than never. Am I headed for pre-diabetes? If so, what evidence shows me a path to avoid that condition?

CARE-MMEDS (what MEDS I take, what compliance I have, etc)

CARE-RResting Metabolic Rate (calories burned at rest)

CARE-VVITALS (pulse, BP, etc)

CARE-LLABS (blood testing, etc)

CARE-SSleep (duration, deep sleep, etc)


EAT is short for eating and drinking. The call to action is “Eat well.”

Well-being eating is the exploration of how what we eat and drink contributes to our well-being. Naturally, there is a social element, where eating and drinking together makes the experience more fulfilling. There is a physiological element, having to do with ingestion, osmosis, calories, glucose and glycogen, enzymes, etc. There is a psychological element, related to the feelings of satiety, or hunger, or thirst, and their related cravings. There is a sensory element, where sweet and sour contrasts, aromas, and their related metaphorical associations, play a part.

Eating delicious food and drink with friends is certainly a component. But achieving a balanced diet, with moderation as a central tenant,

On the one hand, this pillar is ancient. For thousands of years, elders have taught daughters and sons how to cook well. and cooking techniques have evolved

On the other hand, this pillar is ripe for innovation. The new breakthrough science related to the micro-biome is a part.

EATS (what I eat and drink, especially calories)


Monitoring all components of ACE (MEDS, Activity, Resting Metabolism,VITALS, EATS, LABS, Sleep) is now going to accelerate at an exponential rate.

There will be three settings where ACE monitoring will accelerate:

Employees in Workplaces: Employers will offer employees routine monitoring as part of employee benefits and/or health insurance.
Residents in Communities: Communities will offer residents routine monitoring as one of their amenities. Wellbeing facilities and programs will become as important as golf courses and swimming pools. Look for HOA’s,Condo and Coop associations, and subdivision developers to increasingly view MARVELS as critical to “place-making”.
Clients of service-providers: Hotels, spas, assisted-living centers, nursing homes, and many others will increasingly offer MARVELS monitoring as one of their base services.

The Privacy Imperative will be the critical success factor for all of these pushes into the future. It is foundational.

Without it, there will be no progress.

With it, personalized, real-time care will flourish. Each individual will be able to opt-in to his care-coaching community (and to opt-out whenever they choose), and get the extraordinary benefits that such a community can provide.

Want to talk to your well-being coach? FaceTime them, and they – with your permission – will help you sort out what’s going on with you.

Feel like you might need a check-in with a doctor? Send them an email – with your ACE history embedded in it, or get them on the phone or FaceTime, and see if they need you to come in.

The future is now.

BEWELL Centers will be everywhere. Look for:

DWELL CENTERS (part of BEWELL Centers) – for community ACE measuring and monitoring support. Target population is neighbors in the community.

Employee BEWELL CENTERS (part of BEWELL Centers) – for employees in workplaces ACE measuring and monitoring support. Target population is employees in the workplace.

CLIENT BEWELL CENTERS (Part of BEWELL Centers – for service-providers ACE measuring and monitoring support.Target population is clients of the service provider.
(Walgreens and CVS are already moving aggressively in this direction>

The Privacy Imperative
LABS revolution
LABS By Disease
Quantified Self Movement