Monthly Archives: December 2017

Neo.Life

This beta site NeoLife link beyond the splash pagee is tracking the “neobiological revolution”. I wholeheartedly agree that some of our best and brightest are on the case. Here they are:

ABOUT
NEO.LIFE
Making Sense of the Neobiological Revolution
NOTE FROM THE EDITOR
Mapping the brain, sequencing the genome, decoding the microbiome, extending life, curing diseases, editing mutations. We live in a time of awe and possibility — and also enormous responsibility. Are you prepared?

EDITORS

FOUNDER

Jane Metcalfe
Founder of Neo.life. Entrepreneur in media (Wired) and food (TCHO). Lover of mountains, horses, roses, and kimchee, though not necessarily in that order.
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EDITOR
Brian Bergstein
Story seeker and story teller. Editor at NEO.LIFE. Former executive editor of MIT Technology Review; former technology & media editor at The Associated Press
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ART DIRECTOR
Nicholas Vokey
Los Angeles-based graphic designer and animator.
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CONSULTANT
Saul Carlin
founder @subcasthq. used to work here.

EDITOR
Rachel Lehmann-Haupt
Editor, www.theartandscienceoffamily.com & NEO.LIFE, author of In Her Own Sweet Time: Egg Freezing and the New Frontiers of Family

Laura Cochrane
“To oppose something is to maintain it.” — Ursula K. Le Guin

WRITERS

Amanda Schaffer
writes for the New Yorker and Neo.life, and is a former medical columnist for Slate. @abschaffer

Mallory Pickett
freelance journalist in Los Angeles

Karen Weintraub
Health/Science journalist passionate about human health, cool researcher and telling stories.

Anna Nowogrodzki
Science and tech journalist. Writing in Nature, National Geographic, Smithsonian, mental_floss, & others.
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Juan Enriquez
Best-selling author, Managing Director of Excel Venture Management.

Christina Farr
Tech and features writer. @Stanford grad.

NEO.LIFE
Making sense of the Neobiological Revolution. Get the email at www.neo.life.

Maria Finn
I’m an author and tell stories across multiple mediums including prose, food, gardens, technology & narrative mapping. www.mariafinn.com Instagram maria_finn1.

Stephanie Pappas
I write about science, technology and the things people do with them.

David Eagleman
Neuroscientist at Stanford, internationally bestselling author of fiction and non-fiction, creator and presenter of PBS’ The Brain.

Kristen V. Brown
Reporter @Gizmodo covering biotech.

Thomas Goetz

David Ewing Duncan
Life science journalist; bestselling author, 9 books; NY Times, Atlantic, Wired, Daily Beast, NPR, ABC News, more; Curator, Arc Fusion www.davidewingduncan.com

Dorothy Santos
writer, editor, curator, and educator based in the San Francisco Bay Area about.me/dorothysantos.com

Dr. Sophie Zaaijer
CEO of PlayDNA, Postdoctoral fellow at the New York Genome Center, Runway postdoc at Cornell Tech.

Andrew Rosenblum
I’m a freelance tech writer based in Oakland, CA. You can find my work at Neo.Life, the MIT Technology Review, Popular Science, and many other places.

Zoe Cormier

Diana Crow
Fledgling science journalist here, hoping to foster discussion about the ways science acts as a catalyst for social change #biology

Ashton Applewhite
Calling for a radical aging movement. Anti-ageism blog+talk+book

Grace Rubenstein
Journalist, editor, media producer. Social/bio science geek. Tweets on health science, journalism, immigration. Spanish speaker & dancing fool.

Science and other sundries.

Esther Dyson
Internet court jEsther — I occupy Esther Dyson. Founder @HICCup_co https://t.co/5dWfUSratQ http://t.co/a1Gmo3FTQv

Jessica Leber
Freelance science and technology journalist and editor, formerly on staff at Fast Company, Vocativ, MIT Technology Review, and ClimateWire.

Jessica Carew Kraft
An anthropologist, artist, and naturalist writing about health, education, and rewilding. Mother to two girls in San Francisco.

Corby Kummer
Senior editor, The Atlantic, five-time James Beard Journalism Award winner, restaurant reviewer for New York, Boston, and Atlanta magazines

K McGowan
Journalist. Reporting on health, medicine, science, other excellent things. T: @mcgowankat

Rob Waters
I’m a journalist living in Berkeley. I write about health, science, social justice and policy. Father of 1. From Detroit.
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Yiting Sun
writes for MIT Technology Review and Neo.life from Beijing, and was based in Accra, Ghana, in 2014 and 2015.
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Michael Hawley
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Richard Sprague
Curious amateur. Years of near-daily microbiome experiments. US CEO of AI healthcare startup http://airdoc.com
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Bob Parks ✂
Connoisseur of the slap dash . . . maker . . . runner . . . writer of Outside magazine’s Gear Guy blog . . . freelance writer and reporter.

CREDIT: https://medium.com/neodotlife/review-of-daytwo-microbiome-test-deacd5464cd5

Microbiome Apps Personalize EAT recommendations

Richard Sprague provides a useful update about the microbiome landscape below. Microbiome is exploding. Your gut can be measured, and your gut can influence your health and well-being. But now …. these gut measurements can offer people a first: personalized nutrition information.

Among the more relevant points:

– Israel’s Weitzman Institute is the global leader academically. Eran Elinav, a physician and immunologist at the Weizmann Institute and one of their lead investigators (see prior post).
– The older technology for measuring the gut is called “16S” sequencing. It tell you at a high level which kinds of microbes are present. It’s cheap and easy, but 16S can see only broad categories,
– The companies competing to measure your microbiome are uBiome, American Gut, Thryve, DayTwo and Viome. DayTwo and Viome offer more advanced technology (see below).
– The latest technology seems to be “metagenomic sequencing”. It is better because it is more specific and detailed.
– By combining “metagenomic sequencing” information with extensive research about how certain species interact with particular foods, machine-learning algorithms can recommend what you should eat.
– DayTwo offers a metagenomic sequencing for $299, and then combines that with all available research to offer personalized nutrition information.
– DayTwo recently completed a $12 million financing round from, among others, Mayo Clinic, which announced it would be validating the research in the U.S.
– DayTwo draws its academic understandings from Israel’s Weitzman Institute. The app is based on more than five years of highly cited research showing, for example, that while people on average respond similarly to white bread versus whole grain sourdough bread, the differences between individuals can be huge: what’s good for one specific person may be bad for another.

CREDIT: Article on Microbiome Advances

When a Double-Chocolate Brownie is Better for You Than Quinoa

A $299 microbiome test from DayTwo turns up some counterintuitive dietary advice.

Why do certain diets work well for some people but not others? Although several genetic tests try to answer that question and might help you craft ideal nutrition plans, your DNA reveals only part of the picture. A new generation of tests from DayTwo and Viome offer diet advice based on a more complete view: they look at your microbiome, the invisible world of bacteria that help you metabolize food, and, unlike your DNA, change constantly throughout your life.
These bugs are involved in the synthesis of vitamins and other compounds in food, and they even play a role in the digestion of gluten. Artificial sweeteners may not contain calories, but they do modify the bacteria in your gut, which may explain why some people continue to gain weight on diet soda. Everyone’s microbiome is different.

So how well do these new tests work?
Basic microbiome tests, long available from uBiome, American Gut, Thryve, and others, based on older “16S” sequencing, can tell you at a high level which kinds of microbes are present. It’s cheap and easy, but 16S can see only broad categories, the bacterial equivalent of, say, canines versus felines. But just as your life might depend on knowing the difference between a wolf and a Chihuahua, your body’s reaction to food often depends on distinctions that can be known only at the species level. The difference between a “good” microbe and a pathogen can be a single DNA base pair.

New tests use more precise “metagenomic” sequencing that can make those distinctions. And by combining that information with extensive research about how those species interact with particular foods, machine-learning algorithms can recommend what you should eat. (Disclosure: I am a former “citizen scientist in residence” at uBiome. But I have no current relationship with any of these companies; I’m just an enthusiast about the microbiome.)

I recently tested myself with DayTwo ($299) to see what it would recommend for me, and I was pleased that the advice was not always the standard “eat more vegetables” that you’ll get from other products claiming to help you eat healthily. DayTwo’s advice is much more specific and often refreshingly counterintuitive. It’s based on more than five years of highly cited research at Israel’s Weizmann Institute, showing, for example, that while people on average respond similarly to white bread versus whole grain sourdough bread, the differences between individuals can be huge: what’s good for one specific person may be bad for another.

In my case, whole grain breads all rate C-. French toast with challah bread: A.

The DayTwo test was pretty straightforward: you collect what comes out of your, ahem, gut, which involves mailing a sample from your time on the toilet. Unlike the other tests, which can analyze the DNA found in just a tiny swab from a stain on a piece of toilet paper, DayTwo requires more like a tablespoon. The extra amount is needed for DayTwo’s more comprehensive metagenomics sequencing.

Since you can get a microbiome test from other companies for under $100, does the additional metagenomic information from DayTwo justify its much higher price? Generally, I found the answer is yes.

About two months after I sent my sample, my iPhone lit up with my results in a handy app that gave me a personalized rating for most common foods, graded from A+ to C-. In my case, whole grain breads all rate C-. Slightly better are pasta and oatmeal, each ranked C+. Even “healthy” quinoa — a favorite of gluten-free diets — was a mere B-. Why? DayTwo’s algorithm can’t say precisely, but among the hundreds of thousands of gut microbe and meal combinations it was trained on, it finds that my microbiome doesn’t work well with these grains. They make my blood sugar rise too high.

So what kinds of bread are good for me? How about a butter croissant (B+) or cheese ravioli (A-)? The ultimate bread winner for me: French toast with challah bread (A). These recommendations are very different from the one-size-fits-all advice from the U.S. Department of Agriculture or the American Diabetes Association.

I was also pleased to learn that a Starbucks double chocolate brownie is an A- for me, while a 100-calorie pack of Snyder’s of Hanover pretzels gets a C-. That might go against general diet advice, but an algorithm determined that the thousands of bacterial species inside me tend to metabolize fatty foods in a way that results in healthier blood sugar levels than what I get from high-carb foods. Of course, that’s advice just for me; your mileage may vary.

Although the research behind DayTwo has been well-reviewed for more than five years, the app is new to the U.S., so the built-in food suggestions often seem skewed toward Middle Eastern eaters, perhaps the Israeli subjects who formed the original research cohort. That might explain why the app’s suggestions for me include lamb souvlaki with yogurt garlic dip for dinner (A+) and lamb kabob and a side of lentils (A) for lunch. They sound delicious, but to many American ears they might not have the ring of “pork ribs” or “ribeye steak,” which have the same A+ rating. Incidentally, DayTwo recently completed a $12 million financing round from, among others, Mayo Clinic, which announced it would be validating the research in the U.S., so I expect the menu to expand with more familiar fare.

Fortunately you’re not limited to the built-in menu choices. The app includes a “build a meal” function that lets you enter combinations of foods from a large database that includes packaged items from Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods.

There is much more to the product, such as a graphical rendering of where my microbiome fits on the spectrum of the rest of the population that eats a particular food. Since the microbiome changes constantly, this will help me see what is different when I do a retest and when I try Viome and other tests.

I’ve had my DayTwo results for only a few weeks, so it’s too soon to know what happens if I take the app’s advice over the long term. Thankfully I’m in good health and reasonably fit, but for now I’ll be eating more strawberries (A+) and blackberries (A-), and fewer apples (B-) and bananas (C+). And overall I’m looking forward to a future where each of us will insist on personalized nutritional information. We all have unique microbiomes, and an app like DayTwo lets us finally eat that way too.

Richard Sprague is a technology executive and quantified-self enthusiast who has worked at Apple, Microsoft, and other tech companies. He is now the U.S. CEO of an AI healthcare startup, Airdoc.

====================APPENDIX: Older Posts about the microbiome =========

Microbiome Update
CREDIT: https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-disrupting-your-guts-rhythm-affects-your-health-1488164400?mod=e2tw A healthy community of microbes in the gut maintains regular daily cycles of activities. A healthy community of microbes in the gut maintains regular daily cycles of activities.PHOTO: WEIZMANN INSTITUTE By LARRY M. GREENBERG Updated Feb. 27, 2017 3:33 p.m. ET 4 COMMENTS New research is helping to unravel the mystery of how […]

Vibrant Health measures microbiome

Home

Microbiome Update
My last research on this subject was in August, 2014. I looked at both microbiomes and proteomics. Today, the New York Times published a very comprehensive update on microbiome research: Link to New York Time Microbiome Article Here is the article itself: = = = = = = = ARTICLE BEGINS HERE = = = […]

Microbiomes
Science is advancing on microbiomes in the gut. The key to food is fiber, and the key to best fiber is long fibers, like cellulose, uncooked or slightly sauteed (cooking shortens fiber length). The best vegetable, in the view of Jeff Leach, is a leek. Eating Well Article on Microbiome = = = = = […]

Arivale Launches LABS company
“Arivale” Launched and Moving Fast. They launched last month. They have 19 people in the Company and a 107 person pilot – but their plans are way more ambitious than that. Moreover: “The founders said they couldn’t envision Arivale launching even two or three years ago.” Read on …. This is an important development: the […]

Precision Wellness at Mt Sinai
My Sinai announcement Mount Sinai to Establish Precision Wellness Center to Advance Personalized Healthcare Mount Sinai Health System Launches Telehealth Initiatives Joshua Harris, co-Founder of Apollo Global Management, and his wife, Marjorie has made a $5 million gift to the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai to establish the Harris Center for Precision Wellness. […]

Proteomics
“Systems biology…is about putting together rather than taking apart, integration rather than reduction. It requires that we develop ways of thinking about integration that are as rigorous as our reductionist programmes, but different….It means changing our philosophy, in the full sense of the term” (Denis Noble).[5] Proteomics From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For the journal […]

GPEE State of Education in GA

On November 9 the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education held a Critical Issues Forum on public perception polling and our new policy framework: EdQuest Georgia.

Michael Gilligan (Vice President, Strategic Initiatives) and Hans Voss (Senior Associate) from Achieve presented polling data on people’s public perceptions of education. You can find that data and presentation here.http://www.gpee.org/fileadmin/files/PDFs/Achieve_Georgia_report_deck_for_morning_presentation_110617.pdf

In addition to the public perception polling data, our Director of Policy & Research – Dr. Dana Rickman – presented EdQuest Georgia, the Partnership’s new research that identifies seven core areas that states and countries are using to achieve great success with their public education systems. You can find her presentation here.Rickman Presentation

If you were not able to attend and would like to watch the Forum in its entirety, you can view it on our YouTube page here.YouTube Link

For those of you who were able to make it to the Forum, we hope you found it to be informative. Thank you for your participation! Please share these links with anyone who is interested in improving public education in Georgia.

Marketing Automation Software

Pardot believes they are perfecting lead generation through supplemental technologies.

See Pardot Website

Salesforce.com believes in the idea enough to buy them.

At a high level, this is about accepting that most leads are not “hot”, Pardot offers a way to nurture all warm leads and monitor whether they are moving toward cold or hot. If hot, the Pardot nurtures tha relationship in a way most relevant to the lead. They call this Smarter lead generation and effortless email marketing.

My friend Andrew M is a Salesforce expert and swears by them.